Tag Archives: Test Your Knowledge

Test Your Knowledge: December 2022

In October we counted the ways to cross the Thames, what other facts do you know about traversing London’s waterway? As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Can you remember how many ways there were to cross the Thames that was publicly accessible to humans?
49
WRONG A total of 11 routes to cross the Thames on a London Underground line, plus 14 other railway crossings. There are 25 roads and/or footbridges to cross the Thames, plus 5 pedestrian/vehicle tunnels. We have 3 boat and ferry services offering direct routes across the Thames. In addition the cable car between Royal Docks and North Greenwich, whatever they call it this week. The total number of ways to cross the Thames by this count is 59.
59
CORRECT A total of 11 routes to cross the Thames on a London Underground line, plus 14 other railway crossings. There are 25 roads and/or footbridges to cross the Thames, plus 5 pedestrian/vehicle tunnels. We have 3 boat and ferry services offering direct routes across the Thames. In addition the cable car between Royal Docks and North Greenwich, whatever they call it this week. The total number of ways to cross the Thames by this count is 59.
39
WRONG A total of 11 routes to cross the Thames on a London Underground line, plus 14 other railway crossings. There are 25 roads and/or footbridges to cross the Thames, plus 5 pedestrian/vehicle tunnels. We have 3 boat and ferry services offering direct routes across the Thames. In addition the cable car between Royal Docks and North Greenwich, whatever they call it this week. The total number of ways to cross the Thames by this count is 59.
2. On 30th December 1952 Albert Gunter made the newspapers for his unusual river crossing. Why?
He was the first to paraglide across the Thames
WRONG On the 30th December 1952, Albert Gunter was travelling north over Tower Bridge when it started to open, he accelerated and successfully jumped the bridge with only one injury, the bus conductor broke his leg. Albert was awarded £10 and a day off work for his quick thinking.
He jumped Tower Bridge while driving a bus
CORRECT On the 30th December 1952, Albert Gunter was travelling north over Tower Bridge when it started to open, he accelerated and successfully jumped the bridge with only one injury, the bus conductor broke his leg. Albert was awarded £10 and a day off work for his quick thinking.
He walked on a tightrope between Tower Bridge’s towers
WRONG On the 30th December 1952, Albert Gunter was travelling north over Tower Bridge when it started to open, he accelerated and successfully jumped the bridge with only one injury, the bus conductor broke his leg. Albert was awarded £10 and a day off work for his quick thinking.
3. What have John Burns, Ernest Bevin and James Newman to do with crossing the Thames?
They’re the names of three 1963-built Woolwich ferries
CORRECT The Ernest Bevin, John Burns and James Newman ferries, named after local politicians, have been chugging vehicles across the Thames to and from Woolwich for more than 50 years. The old sea dogs made their last trip on 5th October 2018.
They’re politicians who opened a tunnel under the Thames on the Jubilee Line
WRONG The Ernest Bevin, John Burns and James Newman ferries, named after local politicians, have been chugging vehicles across the Thames to and from Woolwich for more than 50 years. The old sea dogs made their last trip on 5th October 2018.
They’re captains of Uber Boats by Thames Clippers
WRONG The Ernest Bevin, John Burns and James Newman ferries, named after local politicians, have been chugging vehicles across the Thames to and from Woolwich for more than 50 years. The old sea dogs made their last trip on 5th October 2018.
4. A notice on Albert Bridge commands soldiers to do what?
Stop marching
CORRECT The notice reads: All troops must break step when marching over this bridge. In 1831 the Broughton Suspension Bridge collapsed as a troop of 74 men marched across. Investigations put this down to the effects of mechanical resonance and the army issued an order that troops should ‘break step’ when crossing a bridge.
Stop whistling
WRONG The notice reads: All troops must break step when marching over this bridge. In 1831 the Broughton Suspension Bridge collapsed as a troop of 74 men marched across. Investigations put this down to the effects of mechanical resonance and the army issued an order that troops should ‘break step’ when crossing a bridge.
Stop crossing
WRONG The notice reads: All troops must break step when marching over this bridge. In 1831 the Broughton Suspension Bridge collapsed as a troop of 74 men marched across. Investigations put this down to the effects of mechanical resonance and the army issued an order that troops should ‘break step’ when crossing a bridge.
5. Which bridge carries the A3 over the Thames?
London Bridge
CORRECT The A3, known as the Portsmouth Road is a major road connecting the City of London and Portsmouth via London Bridge, passing close to Kingston upon Thames, Guildford, Haslemere and Petersfield.
Blackfriars Bridge
WRONG The A3, known as the Portsmouth Road is a major road connecting the City of London and Portsmouth via London Bridge, passing close to Kingston upon Thames, Guildford, Haslemere and Petersfield.
Westminster Bridge
WRONG The A3, known as the Portsmouth Road is a major road connecting the City of London and Portsmouth via London Bridge, passing close to Kingston upon Thames, Guildford, Haslemere and Petersfield.
6. Why are there said to be sharp bends at each end of the Rotherhithe Tunnel?
Built to avoid plague pits
WRONG An urban myth is that the bends were installed to prevent horses from seeing daylight at the end of the tunnel too early, which might make them bolt for the exit.
To stop horses bolting for the exit
CORRECT An urban myth is that the bends were installed to prevent horses from seeing daylight at the end of the tunnel too early, which might make them bolt for the exit.
To slow traffic
WRONG An urban myth is that the bends were installed to prevent horses from seeing daylight at the end of the tunnel too early, which might make them bolt for the exit.
7. Which tunnel is longer to walk?
Woolwich Tunnel
WRONG Designed by Sir Maurice Fitzmaurice, the Rotherhithe Tunnel was constructed using both a tunnelling ‘shield’ and the ‘cut and cover’ method, at 4,860 feet in length is four times longer than Greenwich Tunnel.
Greenwich Tunnel
WRONG Designed by Sir Maurice Fitzmaurice, the Rotherhithe Tunnel was constructed using both a tunnelling ‘shield’ and the ‘cut and cover’ method, at 4,860 feet in length is four times longer than Greenwich Tunnel.
Rotherhithe Tunnel
CORRECT Designed by Sir Maurice Fitzmaurice, the Rotherhithe Tunnel was constructed using both a tunnelling ‘shield’ and the ‘cut and cover’ method, at 4,860 feet in length is four times longer than Greenwich Tunnel.
8. Whose motorcade was accidentally split in two when Tower Bridge’s bascules opened in May 1997?
His Holiness Pope John Paul II
WRONG When President Clinton was returning late and behind schedule to the American Embassy from lunch with British Prime Minister Tony Blair at a restaurant on the banks of the Thames, to the horror of his forward security detail who had already crossed the Tower Bridge and cleared traffic for the President’s safe journey, the bridge suddenly opened behind them for a yacht called Gladys which passed beneath on the exact scheduled time previously agreed to by the Embassy.
French President Jacques Chirac
WRONG When President Clinton was returning late and behind schedule to the American Embassy from lunch with British Prime Minister Tony Blair at a restaurant on the banks of the Thames, to the horror of his forward security detail who had already crossed the Tower Bridge and cleared traffic for the President’s safe journey, the bridge suddenly opened behind them for a yacht called Gladys which passed beneath on the exact scheduled time previously agreed to by the Embassy.
President Bill Clinton
CORRECT When President Clinton was returning late and behind schedule to the American Embassy from lunch with British Prime Minister Tony Blair at a restaurant on the banks of the Thames, to the horror of his forward security detail who had already crossed the Tower Bridge and cleared traffic for the President’s safe journey, the bridge suddenly opened behind them for a yacht called Gladys which passed beneath on the exact scheduled time previously agreed to by the Embassy.
9. What is the surname of the father-son team who built the first tunnel under the Thames, which opened in 1843 and now carries trains between Wapping and Rotherhithe?
Brunel
CORRECT Built between 1825 and 1843 by Marc Brunel and his son Isambard using the tunnel shield, was originally designed for horse-drawn carriages, but was mainly used by pedestrians and became a tourist attraction. In 1869 it was converted into a railway tunnel which, since 2010, is part of the London Overground Railway Network.
Rennie
WRONG Built between 1825 and 1843 by Marc Brunel and his son Isambard using the tunnel shield, was originally designed for horse-drawn carriages, but was mainly used by pedestrians and became a tourist attraction. In 1869 it was converted into a railway tunnel which, since 2010, is part of the London Overground Railway Network.
Locke
WRONG Built between 1825 and 1843 by Marc Brunel and his son Isambard using the tunnel shield, was originally designed for horse-drawn carriages, but was mainly used by pedestrians and became a tourist attraction. In 1869 it was converted into a railway tunnel which, since 2010, is part of the London Overground Railway Network.
10. How many times does the Jubilee Line pass under the Thames?
3
WRONG The Jubilee line crosses beneath the Thames an impressive four times within nine stops: between Westminster and Waterloo; Canada Water and Canary Wharf; Canary Wharf and North Greenwich; and North Greenwich and Canning Town.
4
CORRECT The Jubilee line crosses beneath the Thames an impressive four times within nine stops: between Westminster and Waterloo; Canada Water and Canary Wharf; Canary Wharf and North Greenwich; and North Greenwich and Canning Town.
2
WRONG The Jubilee line crosses beneath the Thames an impressive four times within nine stops: between Westminster and Waterloo; Canada Water and Canary Wharf; Canary Wharf and North Greenwich; and North Greenwich and Canning Town.

Test Your Knowledge: November 2022

This month’s quiz titled London around the world… and beyond. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. 1 As a former colonial power, the name of our capital has been foisted on settlements around the world, but how many?
19
WRONG There are a total of 18 Londons in the United States, two in Alabama, and two in Ohio, you can also find London in: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Canada has a London in the province of Ontario, the second largest London in the world (after, of course, ours). The main settlement on Christmas Island (AKA Kiritimati) in Kiribati (an island nation in the Pacific Ocean) is called London. There are five Londons in the African continent: one in Equatorial Guinea, three in South Africa and one in Nigeria. South Africa also has a city called East London. There is also a London Island in Chile, a London in Belize and, slightly closer to home, a London in Finland. In total 29.
29
CORRECT There are a total of 18 Londons in the United States, two in Alabama, and two in Ohio, you can also find London in: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Canada has a London in the province of Ontario, the second largest London in the world (after, of course, ours). The main settlement on Christmas Island (AKA Kiritimati) in Kiribati (an island nation in the Pacific Ocean) is called London. There are five Londons in the African continent: one in Equatorial Guinea, three in South Africa and one in Nigeria. South Africa also has a city called East London. There is also a London Island in Chile, a London in Belize and, slightly closer to home, a London in Finland. In total 29.
39
WRONG There are a total of 18 Londons in the United States, two in Alabama, and two in Ohio, you can also find London in: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Canada has a London in the province of Ontario, the second largest London in the world (after, of course, ours). The main settlement on Christmas Island (AKA Kiritimati) in Kiribati (an island nation in the Pacific Ocean) is called London. There are five Londons in the African continent: one in Equatorial Guinea, three in South Africa and one in Nigeria. South Africa also has a city called East London. There is also a London Island in Chile, a London in Belize and, slightly closer to home, a London in Finland. In total 29.
2. In which American state can you find much of the previous London Bridge, which was shipped over to the States in the late 1960s?
Arkansas
WRONG What Londoners may not know is that they needn’t travel 5,400 miles to Arizona to keep an eye on their erstwhile icon. Thanks to a 2r hour webcam, you can watch cars whizz over the bridge (not many red double-deckers, alas) while boats navigate through its arches — from the comfort of your London home.
Arizona
CORRECT What Londoners may not know is that they needn’t travel 5,400 miles to Arizona to keep an eye on their erstwhile icon. Thanks to a 2r hour webcam, you can watch cars whizz over the bridge (not many red double-deckers, alas) while boats navigate through its arches — from the comfort of your London home.
Alabama
WRONG What Londoners may not know is that they needn’t travel 5,400 miles to Arizona to keep an eye on their erstwhile icon. Thanks to a 2r hour webcam, you can watch cars whizz over the bridge (not many red double-deckers, alas) while boats navigate through its arches — from the comfort of your London home.
3. The Battle of Porto Bello in 1739 is commemorated in Notting Hill’s Portobello Road. But in which present-day country did the battle take place?
Panama
CORRECT The capture of Puerto Bello was part of a campaign known as ‘The War of Jenkins’ Ear’, fought against Spain in the West Indian colonies. When merchant sea captain Robert Jenkins had his ear cut off by a Spanish officer at Havana in 1731 it led to calls in Parliament for war with Spain. Captain Edward Vernon claimed he could take the Spanish town of Porto Bello on the north side of the Isthmus of Darien between Columbia and Panama – with only six ships of the line, this he duly achieved on 22 November 1739.
Portugal
WRONG The capture of Puerto Bello was part of a campaign known as ‘The War of Jenkins’ Ear’, fought against Spain in the West Indian colonies. When merchant sea captain Robert Jenkins had his ear cut off by a Spanish officer at Havana in 1731 it led to calls in Parliament for war with Spain. Captain Edward Vernon claimed he could take the Spanish town of Porto Bello on the north side of the Isthmus of Darien between Columbia and Panama – with only six ships of the line, this he duly achieved on 22 November 1739.
Paraguay
WRONG The capture of Puerto Bello was part of a campaign known as ‘The War of Jenkins’ Ear’, fought against Spain in the West Indian colonies. When merchant sea captain Robert Jenkins had his ear cut off by a Spanish officer at Havana in 1731 it led to calls in Parliament for war with Spain. Captain Edward Vernon claimed he could take the Spanish town of Porto Bello on the north side of the Isthmus of Darien between Columbia and Panama – with only six ships of the line, this he duly achieved on 22 November 1739.
4. Severndroog Castle is a famous folly on Shooter’s Hill and takes its name from an island fortress in which country?
India
CORRECT Its name is taken from an island fortress in India captured by Commodore Sir William James in 1755. While commonly referred to as a castle due to its turrets, it was built as a folly, as can be discerned by its small size and because it has never functioned as a castle.
Indonesia
WRONG Its name is taken from an island fortress in India captured by Commodore Sir William James in 1755. While commonly referred to as a castle due to its turrets, it was built as a folly, as can be discerned by its small size and because it has never functioned as a castle.
Iraq
WRONG Its name is taken from an island fortress in India captured by Commodore Sir William James in 1755. While commonly referred to as a castle due to its turrets, it was built as a folly, as can be discerned by its small size and because it has never functioned as a castle.
5. In which American state would you find the Thames River, which flows 15 miles from Norwich to New London?
Connecticut
CORRECT The Thames River a short river in Connecticut flows for 15 miles from Norwich to New London.
California
WRONG The Thames River a short river in Connecticut flows for 15 miles from Norwich to New London.
Colorado
WRONG The Thames River a short river in Connecticut flows for 15 miles from Norwich to New London.
6. The Memorial to Paddy the Wanderer, in Wellington, New Zealand is a drinking fountain for dogs. It’s built from stones salvaged from which London landmark?
Old Euston Station
WRONG Paddy The Wanderer was an Airedale Terrier who wandered the streets during the Great Depression. He was the beloved pet of a 13-year-old and took to wandering the wharf after his young owner died of pneumonia. Paddy soon became a familiar face as dockers, sailors and taxi drivers kept him well-fed and even turn took turns paying for his annual dog license. When he died of old age in 1939, hundreds of people mourned the loss of their local celebrity as a funeral procession of black taxi cabs accompanied his body across town. In 1945, enough donations were raised to erect a memorial fountain for humans and dogs alike in his honour, using material from old Waterloo Bridge.
Old Waterloo Bridge
CORRECT Paddy The Wanderer was an Airedale Terrier who wandered the streets during the Great Depression. He was the beloved pet of a 13-year-old and took to wandering the wharf after his young owner died of pneumonia. Paddy soon became a familiar face as dockers, sailors and taxi drivers kept him well-fed and even turn took turns paying for his annual dog license. When he died of old age in 1939, hundreds of people mourned the loss of their local celebrity as a funeral procession of black taxi cabs accompanied his body across town. In 1945, enough donations were raised to erect a memorial fountain for humans and dogs alike in his honour, using material from old Waterloo Bridge.
Old Wembley Stadium
WRONG Paddy The Wanderer was an Airedale Terrier who wandered the streets during the Great Depression. He was the beloved pet of a 13-year-old and took to wandering the wharf after his young owner died of pneumonia. Paddy soon became a familiar face as dockers, sailors and taxi drivers kept him well-fed and even turn took turns paying for his annual dog license. When he died of old age in 1939, hundreds of people mourned the loss of their local celebrity as a funeral procession of black taxi cabs accompanied his body across town. In 1945, enough donations were raised to erect a memorial fountain for humans and dogs alike in his honour, using material from old Waterloo Bridge.
7. St. Paul’s Chapel in present-day Manhattan is a direct architectural copy of which famous London church?
St. Paul’s Cathedral
WRONG St. Paul’s Chapel is Manhattan’s oldest public building still in use and is considered the closest replica to St. Martin’s in the Fields, it was designed in 1764 by Thomas McBean, a student of James Gibbs who created St. Martin’s in the Fields, it has the combination that is the signature feature of many New England churches, a monumental portico and an elegant steeple.
St. Clement Danes
WRONG St. Paul’s Chapel is Manhattan’s oldest public building still in use and is considered the closest replica to St. Martin’s in the Fields, it was designed in 1764 by Thomas McBean, a student of James Gibbs who created St. Martin’s in the Fields, it has the combination that is the signature feature of many New England churches, a monumental portico and an elegant steeple.
St. Martin’s in the Fields
CORRECT St. Paul’s Chapel is Manhattan’s oldest public building still in use and is considered the closest replica to St. Martin’s in the Fields, it was designed in 1764 by Thomas McBean, a student of James Gibbs who created St. Martin’s in the Fields, it has the combination that is the signature feature of many New England churches, a monumental portico and an elegant steeple.
8. What was the first biscuit consumed on the moon?
Garibaldi
WRONG Although all these biscuits were invented in Peek Freans’ Bermondsey factory (some dispute this), the bourbon stands as being the very first biscuit to be consumed on the moon by Edwin Aldrin in 1969. The Bourbon biscuit is the 5th most popular biscuit in the United Kingdom selling £80 million, certainly not crumbs.
Custard cream
WRONG Although all these biscuits were invented in Peek Freans’ Bermondsey factory (some dispute this), the bourbon stands as being the very first biscuit to be consumed on the moon by Edwin Aldrin in 1969. The Bourbon biscuit is the 5th most popular biscuit in the United Kingdom selling £80 million, certainly not crumbs.
Bourbon
CORRECT Although all these biscuits were invented in Peek Freans’ Bermondsey factory (some dispute this), the bourbon stands as being the very first biscuit to be consumed on the moon by Edwin Aldrin in 1969. The Bourbon biscuit is the 5th most popular biscuit in the United Kingdom selling £80 million, certainly not crumbs.
9. The prelate of the Vatican wears coloured vestments each signifying the wearer’s position in the church or marking the religious point in the calendar. Which colour was invented in London?
Purple
CORRECT Purple once a rare dye due to its cost, is worn by bishops symbolizing penance, humility and sorrow for Jesus’ suffering. An economical purple was accidentally made by 18-year-old William Perkin at his East End home.
Red
WRONG Purple once a rare dye due to its cost, is worn by bishops symbolizing penance, humility and sorrow for Jesus’ suffering. An economical purple was accidentally made by 18-year-old William Perkin at his East End home.
Green
WRONG Purple once a rare dye due to its cost, is worn by bishops symbolizing penance, humility and sorrow for Jesus’ suffering. An economical purple was accidentally made by 18-year-old William Perkin at his East End home.
10. At Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri can be found a memorial dedicated to Winston Churchill. What forms its centrepiece?
Crosby Hall
WRONG Destroyed on 13th December 1940 by German bombs, St. Mary Aldermanbury’s 7,000 stones were, in the 1960s, relocated on the other side of the Atlantic. The stones had been jumbled and it took a day to locate the first two stones, and a decade to build. Crosby Hall was relocated to Chelsea from The City, while Temple Bar went from Fleet Street to Cheshunt returning to Paternoster Square near St. Paul’s.
St. Mary Aldermanbury
CORRECT Destroyed on 13th December 1940 by German bombs, St. Mary Aldermanbury’s 7,000 stones were, in the 1960s, relocated on the other side of the Atlantic. The stones had been jumbled and it took a day to locate the first two stones, and a decade to build. Crosby Hall was relocated to Chelsea from The City, while Temple Bar went from Fleet Street to Cheshunt returning to Paternoster Square near St. Paul’s.
Temple Bar
WRONG Destroyed on 13th December 1940 by German bombs, St. Mary Aldermanbury’s 7,000 stones were, in the 1960s, relocated on the other side of the Atlantic. The stones had been jumbled and it took a day to locate the first two stones, and a decade to build. Crosby Hall was relocated to Chelsea from The City, while Temple Bar went from Fleet Street to Cheshunt returning to Paternoster Square near St. Paul’s.

Test Your Knowledge: October 2022

This month’s quiz is about all the street furniture in London we take for granted and therefore it could be titled: It’s a load of old bollards. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. For what purpose did London’s first bollards originally serve?
Old lampost bases
WRONG The first bollards installed in London were French cannons. So many were captured at the Battle of Trafalgar, that the Government decided rather than waste them, they could protect kerbs from the thousands of iron-shod wheels of London’s carts. A cannonball was often inserted into the barrel, although copied in later years, some originals can still be found near Shakespeare’s Globe.
Captured naval cannons
CORRECT The first bollards installed in London were French cannons. So many were captured at the Battle of Trafalgar, that the Government decided rather than waste them, they could protect kerbs from the thousands of iron-shod wheels of London’s carts. A cannonball was often inserted into the barrel, although copied in later years, some originals can still be found near Shakespeare’s Globe.
Disused distance waymarkers
WRONG The first bollards installed in London were French cannons. So many were captured at the Battle of Trafalgar, that the Government decided rather than waste them, they could protect kerbs from the thousands of iron-shod wheels of London’s carts. A cannonball was often inserted into the barrel, although copied in later years, some originals can still be found near Shakespeare’s Globe.
2. All over London are to be found blue plaques, many erected by English Heritage. The Square Mile has only one official English Heritage plaque, who does it commemorate?
Charles Dickins
WRONG The brown plaque at 16 Gough Square is one of the earliest to survive, having been erected by the Society of Arts in 1876. Shortly thereafter, the society came to an agreement that any commemorations within the Square Mile would be handled by the City of London Corporation. Johnson’s was the only one to have been erected in the City up to that point. It is an anomaly in that it lies within the City of London which has no Blue Plaques commemorating historic sites.
Samuel Johnson
CORRECT The brown plaque at 16 Gough Square is one of the earliest to survive, having been erected by the Society of Arts in 1876. Shortly thereafter, the society came to an agreement that any commemorations within the Square Mile would be handled by the City of London Corporation. Johnson’s was the only one to have been erected in the City up to that point. It is an anomaly in that it lies within the City of London which has no Blue Plaques commemorating historic sites.
Samuel Pepys
WRONG The brown plaque at 16 Gough Square is one of the earliest to survive, having been erected by the Society of Arts in 1876. Shortly thereafter, the society came to an agreement that any commemorations within the Square Mile would be handled by the City of London Corporation. Johnson’s was the only one to have been erected in the City up to that point. It is an anomaly in that it lies within the City of London which has no Blue Plaques commemorating historic sites.
3. Once ubiquitous on London’s streets, police call boxes now only live on in the popular imagination thanks to Doctor Who. Outside which tube station can you still find a police box, albeit a 1990s pastiche?
Earls Court
CORRECT By 1953, there were 685 police boxes on the streets of London, but the arrival of the personal radio started to render them redundant. Back in the mid-1990s, Earl’s Court was still a very run-down area with plenty of prostitution and drugs, part of the clean-up was the introduction of a police box to give the local bobby somewhere to use as a local base of operations.
Barons Court
WRONG By 1953, there were 685 police boxes on the streets of London, but the arrival of the personal radio started to render them redundant. Back in the mid-1990s, Earl’s Court was still a very run-down area with plenty of prostitution and drugs, part of the clean-up was the introduction of a police box to give the local bobby somewhere to use as a local base of operations.
Tottenham Court Road
WRONG By 1953, there were 685 police boxes on the streets of London, but the arrival of the personal radio started to render them redundant. Back in the mid-1990s, Earl’s Court was still a very run-down area with plenty of prostitution and drugs, part of the clean-up was the introduction of a police box to give the local bobby somewhere to use as a local base of operations.
4. Behind the Savoy in Carting Lane can be found a lampost which gets its power from a very unusual source. What powers its illumination?
Methane
CORRECT The Webb Patent Sewer Gas Lamp was a sewer gas destructor lamp, designed to remove the dangerous build-up of methane in the sewers, it is the last of its kind in London.
Butane
WRONG The Webb Patent Sewer Gas Lamp was a sewer gas destructor lamp, designed to remove the dangerous build-up of methane in the sewers, it is the last of its kind in London.
Hydrogen
WRONG The Webb Patent Sewer Gas Lamp was a sewer gas destructor lamp, designed to remove the dangerous build-up of methane in the sewers, it is the last of its kind in London.
5. Where would you find a memorial to London’s last wolf?
Aldgate
CORRECT Aldgate pump has a wolf’s head protruding from its base, said to mark the spot where the last wolf was shot in the City of London.
Bishopsgate
WRONG Aldgate pump has a wolf’s head protruding from its base, said to mark the spot where the last wolf was shot in the City of London.
Moorgate
WRONG Aldgate pump has a wolf’s head protruding from its base, said to mark the spot where the last wolf was shot in the City of London.
6. A bench opposite Boudica’s statue near Big Ben commemorates its use by a famous politician. What is it called?
The Boris Bench
WRONG In 1885 Bismarck, Germany’s Chancellor on a state visit was taken to the Barclay Brewery in Southwark and asked if he would like to partake in a ‘drop’ of the company’s strongest brew. Bismarck was given a half-flagon which he emptied, he then due to a misunderstanding proceeded to down a second. Passing over Westminster Bridge, he ordered his vehicle to stop, alighted and promptly lurched towards a bench. Giving instructions to be woken in an hour.
The Bismarck Bench
CORRECT In 1885 Bismarck, Germany’s Chancellor on a state visit was taken to the Barclay Brewery in Southwark and asked if he would like to partake in a ‘drop’ of the company’s strongest brew. Bismarck was given a half-flagon which he emptied, he then due to a misunderstanding proceeded to down a second. Passing over Westminster Bridge, he ordered his vehicle to stop, alighted and promptly lurched towards a bench. Giving instructions to be woken in an hour.
The Betty Boothroyd Bench
WRONG In 1885 Bismarck, Germany’s Chancellor on a state visit was taken to the Barclay Brewery in Southwark and asked if he would like to partake in a ‘drop’ of the company’s strongest brew. Bismarck was given a half-flagon which he emptied, he then due to a misunderstanding proceeded to down a second. Passing over Westminster Bridge, he ordered his vehicle to stop, alighted and promptly lurched towards a bench. Giving instructions to be woken in an hour.
7. Since Queen Victoria’s reign, most post boxes have carried the monogram of the reigning monarch. Which king or queen has the fewest examples in London?
George VI
WRONG Edward VIII was king for only 327 days, so it’s hardly surprising that there are only 57 countrywide. London accounts for 10: Beckenham, Finchley, Mill Hill, Peckham, Southwark (2), NW4, SE6 (2), SE15.
Elizabeth II
WRONG Edward VIII was king for only 327 days, so it’s hardly surprising that there are only 57 countrywide. London accounts for 10: Beckenham, Finchley, Mill Hill, Peckham, Southwark (2), NW4, SE6 (2), SE15.
Edward VIII
CORRECT Edward VIII was king for only 327 days, so it’s hardly surprising that there are only 57 countrywide. London accounts for 10: Beckenham, Finchley, Mill Hill, Peckham, Southwark (2), NW4, SE6 (2), SE15.
8. The London Borough of Lambeth is the only London authority (apart from the City) to use Albertus typeface on its street signs, the rest of London uniformly uses Univers Bold Condensed. Why is Lambeth different?
Lambeth is a nuclear-free zone, the signage indicates you’re in a safe place
WRONG Berthold Ludwig Wolpe was a Jewish German designer born in Offenbach, he emigrated to England in 1935 and became a naturalized British citizen in 1947. He resided in Lambeth until he died in 1989. He named his famous typeface after Albertus Magnus, a 13th-century German philosopher and theologian.
A former leader of Lambeth Council designed the typeface
WRONG Berthold Ludwig Wolpe was a Jewish German designer born in Offenbach, he emigrated to England in 1935 and became a naturalized British citizen in 1947. He resided in Lambeth until he died in 1989. He named his famous typeface after Albertus Magnus, a 13th-century German philosopher and theologian.
The typeface designer lived in Lambeth
CORRECT Berthold Ludwig Wolpe was a Jewish German designer born in Offenbach, he emigrated to England in 1935 and became a naturalized British citizen in 1947. He resided in Lambeth until he died in 1989. He named his famous typeface after Albertus Magnus, a 13th-century German philosopher and theologian.
9. Outside London Zoo’s Penguin Beach is an early example of an object found on many of the Capital’s streets. What is it?
A phone box
CORRECT The early K3 telephone kiosk is made from pre-cast concrete sections. There were originally 12,000 K3 kiosks across the UK, but today only three remain — and this is the only one in London.
A Victorian postbox
WRONG The early K3 telephone kiosk is made from pre-cast concrete sections. There were originally 12,000 K3 kiosks across the UK, but today only three remain — and this is the only one in London.
An Edwardian gas lamp
WRONG The early K3 telephone kiosk is made from pre-cast concrete sections. There were originally 12,000 K3 kiosks across the UK, but today only three remain — and this is the only one in London.
10. Sir Goldsworthy Gurney is credited with designing a lifesaving piece of street furniture. Can you name the object?
Pedestrian road refuge island
WRONG Two engineers Joseph Bazalgette, and the excellently-named Sir Goldsworthy Gurney were brought in to build a proper sewer system to contain London’s waste and to design a simple way to ventilate the gases produced by its rotting. Gurney’s stink pipes follow, more-or-less, the route of the main sewers, the gas they ventilate is a delightful cocktail that includes methane, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia — all flammable, all smelly.
A stink pipe
CORRECT Two engineers Joseph Bazalgette, and the excellently-named Sir Goldsworthy Gurney were brought in to build a proper sewer system to contain London’s waste and to design a simple way to ventilate the gases produced by its rotting. Gurney’s stink pipes follow, more-or-less, the route of the main sewers, the gas they ventilate is a delightful cocktail that includes methane, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia — all flammable, all smelly.
Traffic lights
WRONG Two engineers Joseph Bazalgette, and the excellently-named Sir Goldsworthy Gurney were brought in to build a proper sewer system to contain London’s waste and to design a simple way to ventilate the gases produced by its rotting. Gurney’s stink pipes follow, more-or-less, the route of the main sewers, the gas they ventilate is a delightful cocktail that includes methane, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia — all flammable, all smelly.
11. As a bonus, what was the fate of the inventor of the pedestrian road refuge?
A bus ran over him as he cut the ribbon at its inauguration
WRONG In 1864 London’s first traffic island was built in St James’s Street. It was funded by one Colonel Pierpoint who was afraid of being knocked down on his way to (and more likely from) his Pall Mall club. When it was finished, the good colonel dashed across the road to admire his creation, tripped and was bowled over by a cab.
He stepped off his invention and was hit by a taxi
CORRECT In 1864 London’s first traffic island was built in St James’s Street. It was funded by one Colonel Pierpoint who was afraid of being knocked down on his way to (and more likely from) his Pall Mall club. When it was finished, the good colonel dashed across the road to admire his creation, tripped and was bowled over by a cab.
The manufacturer killed him in a dispute over payment
WRONG In 1864 London’s first traffic island was built in St James’s Street. It was funded by one Colonel Pierpoint who was afraid of being knocked down on his way to (and more likely from) his Pall Mall club. When it was finished, the good colonel dashed across the road to admire his creation, tripped and was bowled over by a cab.

Royal Quiz

As a tribute to the late Queen Elizabeth II this quiz is all about our longest reigning Monarch. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Princess Elizabeth married Philip Mountbatten in 1947, due to rationing some of the ingredients came from an unexpected quarter. Who were the donors?
Home & Colonial Stores
WRONG The bride was one of the most famous Girl Guides in the world, it was fitting that some of the ingredients used to make her official wedding cake were donated by Australian Guides. Instead of being eaten at the wedding reception, slices of the 12 wedding cakes were sent to charities, as well as to schoolchildren and patients and staff at hospitals throughout the country.
Australian Girl Guides
CORRECT The bride was one of the most famous Girl Guides in the world, it was fitting that some of the ingredients used to make her official wedding cake were donated by Australian Guides. Instead of being eaten at the wedding reception, slices of the 12 wedding cakes were sent to charities, as well as to schoolchildren and patients and staff at hospitals throughout the country.
A grateful French nation
WRONG The bride was one of the most famous Girl Guides in the world, it was fitting that some of the ingredients used to make her official wedding cake were donated by Australian Guides. Instead of being eaten at the wedding reception, slices of the 12 wedding cakes were sent to charities, as well as to schoolchildren and patients and staff at hospitals throughout the country.
2. In which area of London was Princess Elizabeth, the future Queen, born?
Belgravia
WRONG 17 Bruton Street, Mayfair.
Mayfair
CORRECT 17 Bruton Street, Mayfair.
Kensington
WRONG 17 Bruton Street, Mayfair.
3. What offence is the Queen Elizabeth purported to have committed on 15th May 1939?
She didn’t hand in a train ticket
CORRECT Elizabeth’s first tube ride was from St James’s Park to Tottenham Court Road, with her sister Margaret. It was an eventful journey – the sisters sat in a third-class smoking carriage and were chased by a ticket inspector after forgetting to hand in their tickets.
She smoked a reefer
WRONG Elizabeth’s first tube ride was from St James’s Park to Tottenham Court Road, with her sister Margaret. It was an eventful journey – the sisters sat in a third-class smoking carriage and were chased by a ticket inspector after forgetting to hand in their tickets.
She knocked off a policeman’s helmet
WRONG Elizabeth’s first tube ride was from St James’s Park to Tottenham Court Road, with her sister Margaret. It was an eventful journey – the sisters sat in a third-class smoking carriage and were chased by a ticket inspector after forgetting to hand in their tickets.
4. In St Katharine Docks can be found a giant block of acrylic bearing a royal crown – erected to mark the Queen’s Silver Jubilee in 1977, for what was it originally intended?
As a prop in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey
CORRECT The block was second-hand and was originally commissioned (without the crown) for the famous movie.
An exhibit at The Great Exhibition in Crystal Palace
WRONG The block was second-hand and was originally commissioned (without the crown) for the famous movie.
A prototype aircraft landing indicator
WRONG The block was second-hand and was originally commissioned (without the crown) for the famous movie.
5. According to Royal Chef Darren McGrady, what was the Queen’s favourite type of burger?
Venison and cranberry
CORRECT Venison and cranberry.
Wood pigeon and fennel
WRONG Venison and cranberry.
She NEVER eats burgers
WRONG Venison and cranberry.
6. Westminster Hall, Southwark Cathedral and the Queen’s Chapel of the Savoy all contain a similar type of memorial to mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012. What form do these memorials take?
A marble statue.
WRONG A stained-glass window
Stained-glass window
CORRECT A stained-glass window.
An ornate pulpit
WRONG A stained-glass window
7. One of the most sacred parts of the Coronation is the anointing of the new monarch at Westminster Abbey by the Archbishop of Canterbury. The stored oil made from extracts of roses, oranges, musk, cinnamon and ambergris usually lasts for decades and had been used at several Coronations, so why was a new batch made?
One of the ingredients was thought to be poisonous
WRONG The new batch had to be created for The Queen, as the previous vial had been destroyed during a wartime bombing raid.
Nobody could find the old batch
WRONG The new batch had to be created for The Queen, as the previous vial had been destroyed during a wartime bombing raid.
German bombs destroyed the stored oil
CORRECT The new batch had to be created for The Queen, as the previous vial had been destroyed during a wartime bombing raid.
8. Looking for something special for the Queen’s Coronation, florist and author Constance Spry created what?
Chicken korma
WRONG Probably the most famous dish created for Elizabeth II is the one created for her coronation banquet in 1953, Constance Spry came up with a recipe for cold chicken in a curried cream sauce, served with a salad of herbed rice and green peas. Coronation Chicken has been enjoyed ever since.
A Coronation corsage
WRONG Probably the most famous dish created for Elizabeth II is the one created for her coronation banquet in 1953, Constance Spry came up with a recipe for cold chicken in a curried cream sauce, served with a salad of herbed rice and green peas. Coronation Chicken has been enjoyed ever since.
Coronation chicken
CORRECT Probably the most famous dish created for Elizabeth II is the one created for her coronation banquet in 1953, Constance Spry came up with a recipe for cold chicken in a curried cream sauce, served with a salad of herbed rice and green peas. Coronation Chicken has been enjoyed ever since.
9. The Queen created a new breed of dog, how was it known?
A dorgi, corgi x dachshund
CORRECT This is a cross between a corgi and a dachshund. One of the Queen’s beloved corgis mated with Princess Margaret’s dachshund named Pipkin, spawning the world’s first “dorgi”. Since then there have been 11 dorgis – Tinker, Pickles, Chipper, Piper, Harris, Brandy, Berry, Cider, Candy and Vulcan.
A porgi, corgi x poodle
WRONG This is a cross between a corgi and a dachshund. One of the Queen’s beloved corgis mated with Princess Margaret’s dachshund named Pipkin, spawning the world’s first “dorgi”. Since then there have been 11 dorgis – Tinker, Pickles, Chipper, Piper, Harris, Brandy, Berry, Cider, Candy and Vulcan.
A sorgi, corgi x king charles spaniel
WRONG This is a cross between a corgi and a dachshund. One of the Queen’s beloved corgis mated with Princess Margaret’s dachshund named Pipkin, spawning the world’s first “dorgi”. Since then there have been 11 dorgis – Tinker, Pickles, Chipper, Piper, Harris, Brandy, Berry, Cider, Candy and Vulcan.
10. Famously The Queen didn’t carry cash, but is this true?
Never
WRONG The Queen only carried cash in her purse on Sundays so she could donate money to her church.
She occasionally would have money
CORRECT The Queen only carried cash in her purse on Sundays so she could donate money to her church.
Always
WRONG The Queen only carried cash in her purse on Sundays so she could donate money to her church.

Test Your Knowledge: August 2022

During the war, they were described as ‘Over paid, Over sexed, and Over here’. Yes, the Yanks are in London, but which ones can you identify? As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. According to the 2011 Census, how many residents of Greater London were born in the USA?
44,000
WRONG Incredibly 64,000 Americans registered themselves as living in London according to the last complete Census results to be published by the Office for National Statistics.
64,000
CORRECT Incredibly 64,000 Americans registered themselves as living in London according to the last complete Census results to be published by the Office for National Statistics.
54,000
WRONG Incredibly 64,000 Americans registered themselves as living in London according to the last complete Census results to be published by the Office for National Statistics.
2. Which famous American made a surprise visit to Chingford in July 1952 to ride the model railway?
Mickey Rooney
WRONG Disney was looking to expand into non-animated films but was drawn to Chingford when he found out about its acclaimed model railway. His uncle was a steam engine driver, while a teenage Walt had a summertime job selling food to passengers on a local line, and he had a 5,000ft long model railway track in the garden of his Californian home. When he found out about the track in Ridgeway Park, Chingford he couldn’t resist having a look at the top of the range, and having only opened a few years before.
Walt Disney
CORRECT Disney was looking to expand into non-animated films but was drawn to Chingford when he found out about its acclaimed model railway. His uncle was a steam engine driver, while a teenage Walt had a summertime job selling food to passengers on a local line, and he had a 5,000ft long model railway track in the garden of his Californian home. When he found out about the track in Ridgeway Park, Chingford he couldn’t resist having a look at the top of the range, and having only opened a few years before.
James Stewart
WRONG Disney was looking to expand into non-animated films but was drawn to Chingford when he found out about its acclaimed model railway. His uncle was a steam engine driver, while a teenage Walt had a summertime job selling food to passengers on a local line, and he had a 5,000ft long model railway track in the garden of his Californian home. When he found out about the track in Ridgeway Park, Chingford he couldn’t resist having a look at the top of the range, and having only opened a few years before.
3. Which controversial American soldier is celebrated with a plaque in Marylebone and a stained glass window in Battersea, where he’s buried?
General Benedict Arnold
CORRECT General Benedict Arnold famously changed sides, first fighting for American then British forces during the American Revolutionary War. He later lived in Gloucester Place. The stained glass window in St Mary’s Battersea was completed in 1982.
General George S. Patton
WRONG General Benedict Arnold famously changed sides, first fighting for American then British forces during the American Revolutionary War. He later lived in Gloucester Place. The stained glass window in St Mary’s Battersea was completed in 1982.
General George Custer
WRONG General Benedict Arnold famously changed sides, first fighting for American then British forces during the American Revolutionary War. He later lived in Gloucester Place. The stained glass window in St Mary’s Battersea was completed in 1982.
4. Which American President is represented by a bust overlooking Marylebone Road?
John F. Kennedy
CORRECT John F Kennedy is to be found just west of Park Crescent looking towards Regent’s Park, George Washington’s statue is in Trafalgar Square, while Abraham Lincoln’s statue stands opposite the Houses of Parliament.
George Washington
WRONG John F Kennedy is to be found just west of Park Crescent looking towards Regent’s Park, George Washington’s statue is in Trafalgar Square, while Abraham Lincoln’s statue stands opposite the Houses of Parliament.
Abraham Lincoln
WRONG John F Kennedy is to be found just west of Park Crescent looking towards Regent’s Park, George Washington’s statue is in Trafalgar Square, while Abraham Lincoln’s statue stands opposite the Houses of Parliament.
5. Which American invented the glass harmonica, which can still be played at his former house in central London?
Benjamin Franklin
CORRECT Benjamin Franklin’s harmonica is on show at his house at 36 Craven Street. Jimi Hendrix lived at 25 Brook Street, the same building where Handel resided. Barbara Hutton inherited $40 million from her grandfather, Frank Winfield Woolworth, founder of the Woolworth store chain and bought Winfield House, later donating the building to become the American Ambassador’s residence.
Jimi Hendrix
WRONG Benjamin Franklin’s harmonica is on show at his house at 36 Craven Street. Jimi Hendrix lived at 25 Brook Street, the same building where Handel resided. Barbara Hutton inherited $40 million from her grandfather, Frank Winfield Woolworth, founder of the Woolworth store chain and bought Winfield House, later donating the building to become the American Ambassador’s residence.
Barbara Hutton
WRONG Benjamin Franklin’s harmonica is on show at his house at 36 Craven Street. Jimi Hendrix lived at 25 Brook Street, the same building where Handel resided. Barbara Hutton inherited $40 million from her grandfather, Frank Winfield Woolworth, founder of the Woolworth store chain and bought Winfield House, later donating the building to become the American Ambassador’s residence.
6. Which American singer died on 22nd June 1969 in Cadogan Lane, Chelsea?
Mama Cass Elliot
WRONG Judy Garland died from an accidental barbiturate overdose at her Belgravia home. Mama Cass and The Who drummer Keith Moon departed this world from the same flat owned by fellow musician Harry Nilsson. Texan beauty, Bessie Love was one of the most famous silent screen actresses. As a film star, she was expected to entertain studio executives at parties, so she learned to sing, dance, and play the ukulele, later performing them on screen and stage. Love is credited with being the first person to dance the Charleston on film. She died in Northwood aged 87.
Judy Garland
CORRECT Judy Garland died from an accidental barbiturate overdose at her Belgravia home. Mama Cass and The Who drummer Keith Moon departed this world from the same flat owned by fellow musician Harry Nilsson. Texan beauty, Bessie Love was one of the most famous silent screen actresses. As a film star, she was expected to entertain studio executives at parties, so she learned to sing, dance, and play the ukulele, later performing them on screen and stage. Love is credited with being the first person to dance the Charleston on film. She died in Northwood aged 87.
Bessie Love
WRONG Judy Garland died from an accidental barbiturate overdose at her Belgravia home. Mama Cass and The Who drummer Keith Moon departed this world from the same flat owned by fellow musician Harry Nilsson. Texan beauty, Bessie Love was one of the most famous silent screen actresses. As a film star, she was expected to entertain studio executives at parties, so she learned to sing, dance, and play the ukulele, later performing them on screen and stage. Love is credited with being the first person to dance the Charleston on film. She died in Northwood aged 87.
7. Which American sportsman drew a crowd of 46,000 to Highbury Stadium in May 1966?
Dick Fosbury
WRONG The second world title fight between Muhammad Ali and Henry Cooper held the record for the largest live audience at a British boxing fight. Fosbury revolutionized the high jump by approaching the bar and jumping with his back flying over the bar. Widely regarded as the greatest golfer of all time, Nicklaus won 18 major championships and 73 PGA Tour events.
Jack Nicklaus
WRONG The second world title fight between Muhammad Ali and Henry Cooper held the record for the largest live audience at a British boxing fight. Fosbury revolutionized the high jump by approaching the bar and jumping with his back flying over the bar. Widely regarded as the greatest golfer of all time, Nicklaus won 18 major championships and 73 PGA Tour events.
Muhammad Ali
CORRECT The second world title fight between Muhammad Ali and Henry Cooper held the record for the largest live audience at a British boxing fight. Fosbury revolutionized the high jump by approaching the bar and jumping with his back flying over the bar. Widely regarded as the greatest golfer of all time, Nicklaus won 18 major championships and 73 PGA Tour events.
8. In 1886, future US president Theodore Roosevelt married Edith Carow in St George’s Hanover Square. What was Edith’s unusual middle name, more often associated with a famous puppet?
Orville
WRONG Edith also had a brother, Kermit who died in infancy one year before her birth. Her brother’s first name and her middle name were the surname of a paternal great-uncle, Robert Kermit an American shipowner and owner of the Red Star Line, also called the Kermit Line.
Elmo
WRONG Edith also had a brother, Kermit who died in infancy one year before her birth. Her brother’s first name and her middle name were the surname of a paternal great-uncle, Robert Kermit an American shipowner and owner of the Red Star Line, also called the Kermit Line.
Kermit
CORRECT Edith also had a brother, Kermit who died in infancy one year before her birth. Her brother’s first name and her middle name were the surname of a paternal great-uncle, Robert Kermit an American shipowner and owner of the Red Star Line, also called the Kermit Line.
9. In 1887 an American show, seen by thousands at Earl’s Court, was endorsed by Queen Victoria. Who was the famous showman who attracted such an august following?
Wild Bill Hickok
CORRECT John Robinson Whitley came up with the idea of the exhibition on a plot of land thought unsuitable for housing. Intending to put on an American Exhibition showing goods and products along the lines of the Great Exhibition, he met President Grover Cleveland and while in America saw Buffalo Bill’s Roughriders and Redskin Show. He booked them for Earls Court’s first season and changed the nature of the Exhibition completely. Billed as the ‘Greatest Showman’, in 1882, Barnum purchased a gargantuan 6-ton African elephant named “Jumbo” from the London Zoological Society. In late 1897, Bailey took his giant circus to Europe for a five-year tour, transporting the entire three-ring behemoth to England by ship. The parade alone dazzled audiences that many went home afterwards mistakenly thinking they had seen the entire show.
Phineas Taylor Barnum
WRONG John Robinson Whitley came up with the idea of the exhibition on a plot of land thought unsuitable for housing. Intending to put on an American Exhibition showing goods and products along the lines of the Great Exhibition, he met President Grover Cleveland and while in America saw Buffalo Bill’s Roughriders and Redskin Show. He booked them for Earls Court’s first season and changed the nature of the Exhibition completely. Billed as the ‘Greatest Showman’, in 1882, Barnum purchased a gargantuan 6-ton African elephant named “Jumbo” from the London Zoological Society. In late 1897, Bailey took his giant circus to Europe for a five-year tour, transporting the entire three-ring behemoth to England by ship. The parade alone dazzled audiences that many went home afterwards mistakenly thinking they had seen the entire show.
James A. Bailey
WRONG John Robinson Whitley came up with the idea of the exhibition on a plot of land thought unsuitable for housing. Intending to put on an American Exhibition showing goods and products along the lines of the Great Exhibition, he met President Grover Cleveland and while in America saw Buffalo Bill’s Roughriders and Redskin Show. He booked them for Earls Court’s first season and changed the nature of the Exhibition completely. Billed as the ‘Greatest Showman’, in 1882, Barnum purchased a gargantuan 6-ton African elephant named “Jumbo” from the London Zoological Society. In late 1897, Bailey took his giant circus to Europe for a five-year tour, transporting the entire three-ring behemoth to England by ship. The parade alone dazzled audiences that many went home afterwards mistakenly thinking they had seen the entire show.
10. On 30th September 1959, Hollywood actress Jayne Mansfield cut the ribbon on which west London landmark?
BBC Television Centre
WRONG She got all the glamorous jobs like opening the Chiswick Flyover. In 1964 the flyover became part of the M4 motorway and by 1969 was said to be the most dangerous road in Britain.
Chiswick Flyover
CORRECT She got all the glamorous jobs like opening the Chiswick Flyover. In 1964 the flyover became part of the M4 motorway and by 1969 was said to be the most dangerous road in Britain.
Trellick Tower
WRONG She got all the glamorous jobs like opening the Chiswick Flyover. In 1964 the flyover became part of the M4 motorway and by 1969 was said to be the most dangerous road in Britain.