Tag Archives: Test Your Knowledge

Test Your Knowledge: April

Ihope you enjoyed March’s questions and even managed to answer a few. This month’s quiz is mostly about the bizarre of London. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Which toilets in one Victorian pub are of such historical interest they have a protection order slapped upon them?
The Princess Louise, High Holborn
CORRECT At Princess Louise in High Holborn, the inebriated would at one time have been surprised to find the sight of live goldfish swimming majestically around the glass cisterns in the gent’s toilets. Built-in 1872, named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter it boasts original interior decorative tile work by the firm of W. B. Simpson of Clapham. The building (including the loos) are Grade II listed.
The Red Lion, St. James’s
WRONG At Princess Louise in High Holborn, the inebriated would at one time have been surprised to find the sight of live goldfish swimming majestically around the glass cisterns in the gent’s toilets. Built-in 1872, named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter it boasts original interior decorative tile work by the firm of W. B. Simpson of Clapham. The building (including the loos) are Grade II listed.
The Flask, Hampstead
WRONG At Princess Louise in High Holborn, the inebriated would at one time have been surprised to find the sight of live goldfish swimming majestically around the glass cisterns in the gent’s toilets. Built-in 1872, named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter it boasts original interior decorative tile work by the firm of W. B. Simpson of Clapham. The building (including the loos) are Grade II listed.
2. In Waterloo Place there stands the 124-foot tall Duke of York’s Column. Standing majestically on top is a statute of Prince Frederick, the second son of George III. When it was built, why did wits say the column was so high?
So onlookers would not notice his large nose
WRONG Remembered as the ‘Grand Old Duke of York’ he of marching them up the hill and down again, was the Commander-in-Chief of the British Army. Not only upon his death was he in debt to the tune of £2 million, but every soldier also had 1/- (5p) deducted from his pay to pay for the monument.
So that he could escape his creditors
CORRECT Remembered as the ‘Grand Old Duke of York’ he of marching them up the hill and down again, was the Commander-in-Chief of the British Army. Not only upon his death was he in debt to the tune of £2 million, but every soldier also had 1/- (5p) deducted from his pay to pay for the monument.
It gave him a sense of superiority, looking down upon common folk
WRONG Remembered as the ‘Grand Old Duke of York’ he of marching them up the hill and down again, was the Commander-in-Chief of the British Army. Not only upon his death was he in debt to the tune of £2 million, but every soldier also had 1/- (5p) deducted from his pay to pay for the monument.
3. The Museum of London has many exhibits worthy of your perusal, but which type of World War II gas mask is on display?
A Mickey Mouse gas mask for a child
CORRECT Mickey Mouse gas masks were manufactured in bright primary colours intended to be less distressing to wear for young children.
One suitable to protect a horse from breathing noxious gases
WRONG Mickey Mouse gas masks were manufactured in bright primary colours intended to be less distressing to wear for young children.
A walking stick with a mask hidden within its ferrule
WRONG Mickey Mouse gas masks were manufactured in bright primary colours intended to be less distressing to wear for young children.
4. In attending a service at St. Dunstan-in-the-West, Samuel Pepys would record in his famous diary that on the 18th August 1667 he was not as attentive to the sermon as he should have been. What distracted him?
He eats some oysters
WRONG The young woman responded to his advances by taking several pins out of her pocket and threatened to jab the old reprobate.
He decided to write up his diary for the day
WRONG The young woman responded to his advances by taking several pins out of her pocket and threatened to jab the old reprobate.
He was distracted by a comely woman
CORRECT The young woman responded to his advances by taking several pins out of her pocket and threatened to jab the old reprobate.
5. Brown’s Hotel in Dover Street bore witness to a London first which took place in a ground-floor room in 1876. What groundbreaking event happened?
The first telephone call
CORRECT Alexander Graham Bell visited London in 1876 to tell the Government about his latest invention. He chose to stay at Brown’s during his trip — and made the first-ever telephone call from the hotel to the family home of the hotel’s owner in Ravenscourt Park.
Roller skates were first demonstrated by its inventor
WRONG Alexander Graham Bell visited London in 1876 to tell the Government about his latest invention. He chose to stay at Brown’s during his trip — and made the first-ever telephone call from the hotel to the family home of the hotel’s owner in Ravenscourt Park.
HP Brown Sauce was invented
WRONG Alexander Graham Bell visited London in 1876 to tell the Government about his latest invention. He chose to stay at Brown’s during his trip — and made the first-ever telephone call from the hotel to the family home of the hotel’s owner in Ravenscourt Park.
6. In the 19th century Radcliffe Highway – now just The Highway – was a dangerous part of London. Nevertheless, Charles Jamrach made a living selling what from his store?
Opium supplied by Chinese seamen
WRONG At Tobacco Dock, there is a statue of a small boy in front of a tiger. It commemorates the incident when a fully grown Bengal tiger escaped from Charles Jamrach’s shop which supplied exotic creatures for the circus. Seizing a small boy in its mouth the tiger was persuaded by the shop’s proprietor himself to release the boy unharmed.
Exotic animals
CORRECT At Tobacco Dock, there is a statue of a small boy in front of a tiger. It commemorates the incident when a fully grown Bengal tiger escaped from Charles Jamrach’s shop which supplied exotic creatures for the circus. Seizing a small boy in its mouth the tiger was persuaded by the shop’s proprietor himself to release the boy unharmed.
Sex aids
WRONG At Tobacco Dock, there is a statue of a small boy in front of a tiger. It commemorates the incident when a fully grown Bengal tiger escaped from Charles Jamrach’s shop which supplied exotic creatures for the circus. Seizing a small boy in its mouth the tiger was persuaded by the shop’s proprietor himself to release the boy unharmed.
7. What did Sir Richard Whittington (Dick of Lord Mayor fame) in the 15th-century pay to have built by the Thames near to modern-day Southwark Bridge?
A church
WRONG ‘Whittington’s Longhouse’ used the outgoing tide to flush away the effluent discharged by the users of the toilet.
A memorial celebrating his benevolence
WRONG ‘Whittington’s Longhouse’ used the outgoing tide to flush away the effluent discharged by the users of the toilet.
A public lavatory seating dozens at a time
CORRECT ‘Whittington’s Longhouse’ used the outgoing tide to flush away the effluent discharged by the users of the toilet.
8. Playwright and poet Ben Jonson as one might expect is interned in Westminster Abbey’s poets’ corner. But what was unusual about his burial?
He was buried at 6 pm on 6th June 1666 – all the sixes
WRONGHe told the Dean of Westminster that ‘six feet long by two feet wide is too much for me: two feet by two feet will do for all I want’. The small grave also, of course, reduced the cost of internment.
His burial was attended by all members of the Royal family
WRONG He told the Dean of Westminster that ‘six feet long by two feet wide is too much for me: two feet by two feet will do for all I want’. The small grave also, of course, reduced the cost of internment.
He was buried standing up
CORRECT He told the Dean of Westminster that ‘six feet long by two feet wide is too much for me: two feet by two feet will do for all I want’. The small grave also, of course, reduced the cost of internment.
9. By Victoria Gate in Kensington Gardens away from prying eyes is a cemetery. But what lies entombed there in the unconsecrated ground?
Dogs
CORRECT The Dogs’ Cemetery was started in 1881 by the gatekeeper at Victoria Lodge, a Mr Winbridge, who started burying dogs in the lodge’s garden. The first dog to be buried was called Cherry, a Maltese Terrier, who died of old age. Cherry’s owners used to visit the park regularly and were friends of Mr Winbridge, so when Cherry died they thought it would be a fitting tribute to be buried in Hyde Park. By the time the cemetery closed in 1903, three-hundred tiny burials dotted the grounds.
Suicide victims
WRONG The Dogs’ Cemetery was started in 1881 by the gatekeeper at Victoria Lodge, a Mr Winbridge, who started burying dogs in the lodge’s garden. The first dog to be buried was called Cherry, a Maltese Terrier, who died of old age. Cherry’s owners used to visit the park regularly and were friends of Mr Winbridge, so when Cherry died they thought it would be a fitting tribute to be buried in Hyde Park. By the time the cemetery closed in 1903, three-hundred tiny burials dotted the grounds.
Slaves
WRONG The Dogs’ Cemetery was started in 1881 by the gatekeeper at Victoria Lodge, a Mr Winbridge, who started burying dogs in the lodge’s garden. The first dog to be buried was called Cherry, a Maltese Terrier, who died of old age. Cherry’s owners used to visit the park regularly and were friends of Mr Winbridge, so when Cherry died they thought it would be a fitting tribute to be buried in Hyde Park. By the time the cemetery closed in 1903, three-hundred tiny burials dotted the grounds.
10. On 17th October 1814 eight people met an untimely and unusual end, but what was the cause of their demise?
The Great London Earthquake
WRONG Beer was the drink of choice as the water was often unsafe. The demand led to brewers constructing huge vats as an economical way of producing the beverage. One such vat burst its hoops which in turn ruptured nearby vats. Eventually, more than 323,000 gallons became a tsunami drowning 8 people. The Dominion Theatre stands on the site of the ill-fated Horseshoe Brewery.
The Great Beer Flood
CORRECT Beer was the drink of choice as the water was often unsafe. The demand led to brewers constructing huge vats as an economical way of producing the beverage. One such vat burst its hoops which in turn ruptured nearby vats. Eventually, more than 323,000 gallons became a tsunami drowning 8 people. The Dominion Theatre stands on the site of the ill-fated Horseshoe Brewery.
The Great London Fireworks Display
WRONG Beer was the drink of choice as the water was often unsafe. The demand led to brewers constructing huge vats as an economical way of producing the beverage. One such vat burst its hoops which in turn ruptured nearby vats. Eventually, more than 323,000 gallons became a tsunami drowning 8 people. The Dominion Theatre stands on the site of the ill-fated Horseshoe Brewery.

Test Your Knowledge: March

Ihope you enjoyed February’s questions and even managed to answer a few. This month’s quiz is about firsts in London I’ve posed these questions before so that should give you a fighting chance. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. What was invented in a workshop in Hatton Garden in the 1880s?
The world’s first machine gun
CORRECT Hiram Maxim was an American who moved to London, opened a workshop in Hatton Garden, near the junction with Clerkenwell Road and eventually became a naturalised Briton and a knight of the realm. His Maxim Gun invented in 1881 was the first fully automatic machine gun. At Shangari River in 1893 Cecil Rhodes’ troops, armed with a Maxim Gun, only lost four men and killed 1,500 natives. Not content with killing native Africans he went on to invent the first auto-resetting mousetrap.
The world’s first tank
WRONG Hiram Maxim was an American who moved to London, opened a workshop in Hatton Garden, near the junction with Clerkenwell Road and eventually became a naturalised Briton and a knight of the realm. His Maxim Gun invented in 1881 was the first fully automatic machine gun. At Shangari River in 1893 Cecil Rhodes’ troops, armed with a Maxim Gun, only lost four men and killed 1,500 natives. Not content with killing native Africans he went on to invent the first auto-resetting mousetrap.
The world’s first flame thrower
WRONG Hiram Maxim was an American who moved to London, opened a workshop in Hatton Garden, near the junction with Clerkenwell Road and eventually became a naturalised Briton and a knight of the realm. His Maxim Gun invented in 1881 was the first fully automatic machine gun. At Shangari River in 1893 Cecil Rhodes’ troops, armed with a Maxim Gun, only lost four men and killed 1,500 natives. Not content with killing native Africans he went on to invent the first auto-resetting mousetrap.
2. What ‘first’ did Colonel Pierpoint admire before he died?
The first pedestrian crossing
WRONG At his expense in 1864 Colonel Pierpoint had London’s first traffic island constructed in St. James’s Street opposite his club in Pall Mall. On its completion, his excitement (and possible inebriation) encouraged him to dash across the road to admire his contribution to society. Alas, he was knocked down and killed by a passing cab.
The world’s first traffic island
CORRECT At his expense in 1864 Colonel Pierpoint had London’s first traffic island constructed in St. James’s Street opposite his club in Pall Mall. On its completion, his excitement (and possible inebriation) encouraged him to dash across the road to admire his contribution to society. Alas, he was knocked down and killed by a passing cab.
The first traffic light
WRONG At his expense in 1864 Colonel Pierpoint had London’s first traffic island constructed in St. James’s Street opposite his club in Pall Mall. On its completion, his excitement (and possible inebriation) encouraged him to dash across the road to admire his contribution to society. Alas, he was knocked down and killed by a passing cab.
3. Coram’s Fields commemorates a London first that revolutionised the world. But what?
Charity
CORRECT In 1739 Captain Thomas Coram, a London merchant was appalled by the number of abandoned babies he saw, he set up the Foundling Hospital, the world’s first charity, Handel and Hogarth were among the benefactors of the world’s first incorporated charity. Coram’s Fields are unique in only allowing adults if accompanied by a child.
Vaccine
WRONG In 1739 Captain Thomas Coram, a London merchant was appalled by the number of abandoned babies he saw, he set up the Foundling Hospital, the world’s first charity, Handel and Hogarth were among the benefactors of the world’s first incorporated charity. Coram’s Fields are unique in only allowing adults if accompanied by a child.
Statistics
WRONG In 1739 Captain Thomas Coram, a London merchant was appalled by the number of abandoned babies he saw, he set up the Foundling Hospital, the world’s first charity, Handel and Hogarth were among the benefactors of the world’s first incorporated charity. Coram’s Fields are unique in only allowing adults if accompanied by a child.
4. On 10th January 1946, the first meeting took place of what international organisation?
World Health Organisation
WRONG The First General Assembly of the United Nations, with 51 nations represented, was held in the Methodist Central Hall, Westminster, a successor to the League of Nations, which was thought to have been ineffective in preventing World War II.
Oxfam
WRONG The First General Assembly of the United Nations, with 51 nations represented, was held in the Methodist Central Hall, Westminster, a successor to the League of Nations, which was thought to have been ineffective in preventing World War II.
United Nations
CORRECT The First General Assembly of the United Nations, with 51 nations represented, was held in the Methodist Central Hall, Westminster, a successor to the League of Nations, which was thought to have been ineffective in preventing World War II.
5. Five years before the last public hanging at Newgate, what was the world’s first when completed?
The first urban underground
CORRECT Opening in 1863, the Metropolitan Railway between Paddington (then called Bishop’s Road) and Farringdon was the world’s first urban underground passenger-carrying railway. Confusingly, the original platform now serves the Hammersmith & City Line.
The first tramline
WRONG Opening in 1863, the Metropolitan Railway between Paddington (then called Bishop’s Road) and Farringdon was the world’s first urban underground passenger-carrying railway. Confusingly, the original platform now serves the Hammersmith & City Line.
The first scheduled bus service
WRONG Opening in 1863, the Metropolitan Railway between Paddington (then called Bishop’s Road) and Farringdon was the world’s first urban underground passenger-carrying railway. Confusingly, the original platform now serves the Hammersmith & City Line.
6. Nearly every country now has one, but Croydon saw the world’s first. But what was it that is now commonplace?
A radio station
WRONG In 1920 the world’s first international airport opened in Croydon, offering flights to Europe. A remodelling 8 years saw the world’s first purpose-built airport terminal and airport hotel.
An international airport
CORRECT In 1920 the world’s first international airport opened in Croydon, offering flights to Europe. A remodelling 8 years saw the world’s first purpose-built airport terminal and airport hotel.
A department store
WRONG In 1920 the world’s first international airport opened in Croydon, offering flights to Europe. A remodelling 8 years saw the world’s first purpose-built airport terminal and airport hotel.
7. Today we take it for granted, but what world’s first was constructed near Holborn Viaduct?
The world’s first water pumping station
WRONG The world’s first public electricity generating station was opened in 1882 to light the lamps on the bridge. Designed by Thomas Edison, it was steam-powered and supplied DC current, and predated New York’s power station by some months.
The world’s first sewage treatment works
WRONG The world’s first public electricity generating station was opened in 1882 to light the lamps on the bridge. Designed by Thomas Edison, it was steam-powered and supplied DC current, and predated New York’s power station by some months.
The world’s first public electricity generating station
CORRECT The world’s first public electricity generating station was opened in 1882 to light the lamps on the bridge. Designed by Thomas Edison, it was steam-powered and supplied DC current, and predated New York’s power station by some months.
8. What invention was first demonstrated in a room above what is now the Bar Italia coffee lounge in Frith Street, Soho?
The espresso coffee machine
WRONG John Logie Baird began his research into the transmission of visual images in Hastings in the early 1920s, but in 1924 rented an attic room at 22 Frith Street to use as a workshop. On 26th January 1926 members of the Royal Institution made up the first television audience. A blue plaque is displayed above Bar Italia commemorating that day.
The vacuum cleaner
WRONG John Logie Baird began his research into the transmission of visual images in Hastings in the early 1920s, but in 1924 rented an attic room at 22 Frith Street to use as a workshop. On 26th January 1926 members of the Royal Institution made up the first television audience. A blue plaque is displayed above Bar Italia commemorating that day.
The television
CORRECT John Logie Baird began his research into the transmission of visual images in Hastings in the early 1920s, but in 1924 rented an attic room at 22 Frith Street to use as a workshop. On 26th January 1926 members of the Royal Institution made up the first television audience. A blue plaque is displayed above Bar Italia commemorating that day.
9. What did Joseph Merlin demonstrate for the first time at a masquerade party in Soho in 1760?
Roller skates
CORRECT Roller skates were first demonstrated at famous society hostess’ Mrs Cornelys Soho Square house by clock and instrument maker John Joseph Merlin. Making an appearance at the party gliding across the floor on boots that he had adapted by fitting them with wheels, unfortunately, he had failed to devise a method of stopping himself and he crashed into a large mirror.
The kaleidoscope
WRONG Roller skates were first demonstrated at famous society hostess’ Mrs Cornelys Soho Square house by clock and instrument maker John Joseph Merlin. Making an appearance at the party gliding across the floor on boots that he had adapted by fitting them with wheels, unfortunately, he had failed to devise a method of stopping himself and he crashed into a large mirror.
The penny-farthing bicycle
WRONG Roller skates were first demonstrated at famous society hostess’ Mrs Cornelys Soho Square house by clock and instrument maker John Joseph Merlin. Making an appearance at the party gliding across the floor on boots that he had adapted by fitting them with wheels, unfortunately, he had failed to devise a method of stopping himself and he crashed into a large mirror.
10. In 1905 two brothers named Stratton were convicted of robbery and murder at a paint shop in Deptford High Street. What methodology was used to secure convictions?
The first identikit portrait from a witness, the local milkman
WRONG On 27th March 1905, Chapman’s Oil and Paint Shop was raided and the shopkeeper murdered. A thumb mark was left on the emptied cash box. Using a method of identification that had been in use for a couple of years, it was the first time the Crown achieved a murder conviction and one of the first in the world to use the methodology still in use today.
The first case in which fingerprints were successfully used to convict
CORRECT On 27th March 1905, Chapman’s Oil and Paint Shop was raided and the shopkeeper murdered. A thumb mark was left on the emptied cash box. Using a method of identification that had been in use for a couple of years, it was the first time the Crown achieved a murder conviction and one of the first in the world to use the methodology still in use today.
Their getaway car, which had an early number plate was identified leading to the police tracking them down
WRONG On 27th March 1905, Chapman’s Oil and Paint Shop was raided and the shopkeeper murdered. A thumb mark was left on the emptied cash box. Using a method of identification that had been in use for a couple of years, it was the first time the Crown achieved a murder conviction and one of the first in the world to use the methodology still in use today.

Test Your Knowledge: February

Ihope you enjoyed January’s questions and even managed to answer a few. This month’s quiz is about last in London. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Where is the last remaining tollgate in London?
College Road, Dulwich
CORRECT The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
Well Walk, Hampstead
WRONG The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
Strand on the Green, Chiswick
WRONG The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
2. Who was the last person to be executed in the Tower of London?
Henry Laurens, an American spy during the Revolutionary War
WRONG Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
Josef Jakobs, a German spy during the Second World War
CORRECT Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
Carl Lody, a German spy during the First World War
WRONG Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
3. Where did the last London tram run to on 6 July 1952?
New Cross
CORRECT The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
Elephant and Castle
WRONG The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
Woolwich
WRONG The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
4. In the 1950s the Thames was declared biologically dead. How many fish species are there today?
Less than 50
WRONG In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
Between 50 and 100
WRONG In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
More than 120
CORRECT In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
5. Which London theatre, known as a writers’ theatre, led to the abolition of theatrical censorship in 1968?
Royal Court Theatre
CORRECT From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
The Donmar Warehouse
WRONG From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
Soho Theatre
WRONG From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
6. Spencer Perceval became the last (and the only) British Prime Minister to be assassinated. But where did he die?
On the staircase in 10 Downing Street
WRONG Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
In the lobby of the House of Commons
CORRECT Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
Outside his house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields
WRONG Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
7. Described in Parliament by Benjamin Disraeli as “The Gondolas of London” and invented during Victoria’s reign, the Hansom Cab continued in use into the 20th-century. What year was the last license surrendered?
1927
WRONG The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
1937
WRONG The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
1947
CORRECT The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
8. Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre can lay claim to being a last. But what last in London?
The last open-air theatre to be built
WRONG Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
The last timber-framed building to be erected in London
WRONG Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
The last construction with a thatched roof
CORRECT Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
9. On 12 April 2004 Londoners witnessed the last journey down the Thames of an iconic passenger-carrying vehicle. What was that?
Concorde on route to a museum
CORRECT Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
Waverly the last ocean-going paddle steamer
WRONG Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
One of the last Routemaster buses destined for the scrap
WRONG Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
10. Comics talk of ‘dying’ on stage, but which comedian made his last appearance and actually died on a London stage?
Arthur Askey
WRONG On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.
Tommy Cooper
CORRECT On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.
Dickie Henderson
WRONG On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.

Test Your Knowledge: January

Ihave had enough of complaining after having whinged every Wednesday last year. I now propose to drop this regular post and introduce ‘Test Your Knowledge’ on the first Friday of the month. In some ways, it’s easier than having to find another nugget about London not already covered, but still means I’ll have my work cut out giving 10 questions for your delectation. As with last year’s Christmas Quiz, the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation. This month’s quiz has an artistic slant.

1. Of what did actor James Mason give filmgoers a tour of in 1967?
The London That Nobody Knows
CORRECT Based on a book of the same name by Geoffrey Fletcher, this documentary provides a fascinating portrait of pie-and-mash shops and crumbling old music halls. Fletcher’s book also features a drawing of a Holborn toilet with goldfish swimming in the glass cisterns.
The London Dickens Knew
WRONG Based on a book of the same name by Geoffrey Fletcher, this documentary provides a fascinating portrait of pie-and-mash shops and crumbling old music halls. Fletcher’s book also features a drawing of a Holborn toilet with goldfish swimming in the glass cisterns.
London in the Raw
WRONG Based on a book of the same name by Geoffrey Fletcher, this documentary provides a fascinating portrait of pie-and-mash shops and crumbling old music halls. Fletcher’s book also features a drawing of a Holborn toilet with goldfish swimming in the glass cisterns.
2. In the Richard Curtis comedy Notting Hill, the character played by Hugh Grant is the owner of what kind of business?
An antique stall on the Portobello Road Market
WRONG It specialised in travel books and was modelled on the Travel Bookshop at 13-15 Blenheim Crescent, just off Portobello Road.
A bookshop on the Portobello Road
CORRECT It specialised in travel books and was modelled on the Travel Bookshop at 13-15 Blenheim Crescent, just off Portobello Road.
A secondhand record shop on the Portobello Road
WRONG It specialised in travel books and was modelled on the Travel Bookshop at 13-15 Blenheim Crescent, just off Portobello Road.
3. Wardour Street in Soho has been the administrative home of the British movie industry since the 1920s. Which once illustrious film company had offices at 113 Wardour Street?
Hammer Films
CORRECT 113 Wardour Street was home to Hammer House. Hammer produced a stream of popular horror pictures between the late 1950s and early 1970s.
British Lion
WRONG 113 Wardour Street was home to Hammer House. Hammer produced a stream of popular horror pictures between the late 1950s and early 1970s.
London Films
WRONG 113 Wardour Street was home to Hammer House. Hammer produced a stream of popular horror pictures between the late 1950s and early 1970s.
4. Two very different musicians both have blue plaques to their names in adjoining houses in Brook Street. Who are they?
Jimi Hendrix and George Frederick Handel
CORRECT It would be hard to find two musicians more different but Hendrix is said to have been pleased by the coincidence that he was living in a house next door to one in which Handel had composed so much of his music. The Handel & Hendrix in London Museum now occupies 25 and 23 Brook Street respectively.
Noël Coward and Edward Elgar
WRONG It would be hard to find two musicians more different but Hendrix is said to have been pleased by the coincidence that he was living in a house next door to one in which Handel had composed so much of his music. The Handel & Hendrix in London Museum now occupies 25 and 23 Brook Street respectively.
Duke Ellington and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
WRONG It would be hard to find two musicians more different but Hendrix is said to have been pleased by the coincidence that he was living in a house next door to one in which Handel had composed so much of his music. The Handel & Hendrix in London Museum now occupies 25 and 23 Brook Street respectively.
5. What did punk rock legend Ian Dury call his first group?
Kilburn And The High Roads
CORRECT The name apparently derived from a road sign for ‘Kilburn High Road’ that Dury often passed on his way to score dope at the El Rio Club on the Harrow Road.
The Clapham Junction Stranglers
WRONG The name apparently derived from a road sign for ‘Kilburn High Road’ that Dury often passed on his way to score dope at the El Rio Club on the Harrow Road.
Balham and The B-Roads
WRONG The name apparently derived from a road sign for ‘Kilburn High Road’ that Dury often passed on his way to score dope at the El Rio Club on the Harrow Road.
6. In the 19th-century, an as yet unpublished author working for a railway company was tasked with salvaging headstones from a churchyard that was partly in the path of a new line and had them arranged around a tree that today bears his name, where they remain to this day. What is the name of this eponymous mature tree?
The Thomas Chestnut
WRONG An ash in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church reputed to be the oldest church in Britain. King’s Cross was being regenerated in the 1860s, at this time the exhumation of human remains and the removal of tombs was supervised by the architect Blomfield, although he delegated much of this unpleasant task to his young protégé, Thomas Hardy. The tree is known as “The Hardy Ash” has since grown around the gravestones.
The Hardy Ash
CORRECT An ash in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church reputed to be the oldest church in Britain. King’s Cross was being regenerated in the 1860s, at this time the exhumation of human remains and the removal of tombs was supervised by the architect Blomfield, although he delegated much of this unpleasant task to his young protégé, Thomas Hardy. The tree is known as “The Hardy Ash” has since grown around the gravestones.
The Dickens Plane
WRONG An ash in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church reputed to be the oldest church in Britain. King’s Cross was being regenerated in the 1860s, at this time the exhumation of human remains and the removal of tombs was supervised by the architect Blomfield, although he delegated much of this unpleasant task to his young protégé, Thomas Hardy. The tree is known as “The Hardy Ash” has since grown around the gravestones.
7. Rock stars Jimi Hendrix, Rod Stewart and Jeff Beck have a connection with Manor House Station the start of the first Run on The Knowledge. How so?
They all commuted to work from the station
WRONG Manor House was a long-standing coaching house, a tavern that stood at the junction of Green Lanes and Seven Sisters Road from the early 19th-century to the late 20th-century, it was a venue where they all played early in their careers.
They all worked on the Piccadilly Line
WRONG Manor House was a long-standing coaching house, a tavern that stood at the junction of Green Lanes and Seven Sisters Road from the early 19th-century to the late 20th-century, it was a venue where they all played early in their careers.
The station is named after a pub where they all played
CORRECT Manor House was a long-standing coaching house, a tavern that stood at the junction of Green Lanes and Seven Sisters Road from the early 19th-century to the late 20th-century, it was a venue where they all played early in their careers.
8. Berwick Street, once famous for its record shops, featured on the cover of a 1995 album. What are the British band and the seminal album?
Blur – ‘The Great Escape’
WRONG Oasis might have come a cropper against Blur in the big Britpop singles chart showdown, but the Gallagher brothers had the last laugh with their record-breaking second album. ‘…Morning Glory?’ which shifted 347,000 copies in its week of release as the UK went mad for the band’s last gasp of greatness.
Pulp – ‘Different Class’
WRONG Oasis might have come a cropper against Blur in the big Britpop singles chart showdown, but the Gallagher brothers had the last laugh with their record-breaking second album. ‘…Morning Glory?’ which shifted 347,000 copies in its week of release as the UK went mad for the band’s last gasp of greatness.
Oasis – ‘(What’s The Story) Morning Glory?’
CORRECT Oasis might have come a cropper against Blur in the big Britpop singles chart showdown, but the Gallagher brothers had the last laugh with their record-breaking second album. ‘…Morning Glory?’ which shifted 347,000 copies in its week of release as the UK went mad for the band’s last gasp of greatness.
9. Tower House, 29 Melbury Road, Kensington, the turreted Gothuc pile built by William Burgess in 1877 is home to which guitar legend?
Jimmy Page
CORRECT Outbidding David Bowie, Page acquired the property from hell-raising actor Richard Harris in 1974. Occultist filmmaker Kenneth Anger once lived in Page’s basement. In 2015 Page successfully challenged a planning application lodged by his next-door neighbour Robbie Williams.
Eric Clapton
WRONG Outbidding David Bowie, Page acquired the property from hell-raising actor Richard Harris in 1974. Occultist filmmaker Kenneth Anger once lived in Page’s basement. In 2015 Page successfully challenged a planning application lodged by his next-door neighbour Robbie Williams.
Mark Knopfler
WRONG Outbidding David Bowie, Page acquired the property from hell-raising actor Richard Harris in 1974. Occultist filmmaker Kenneth Anger once lived in Page’s basement. In 2015 Page successfully challenged a planning application lodged by his next-door neighbour Robbie Williams.
10. In 1921 English composer Edward Elgar opened which iconic music brand’s first store, and marked by a plaque on Oxford Street near Davis Street?
Pathé
WRONG HMV brought a new look to music buying, with a school within the store. ‘Bright’ young men from the country were encouraged to learn all the fine shades and nice feelings of their profession – how to satisfy varying music tastes, how to pronounce the names of foreign musicians, and generally to understand what they were selling and the idiosyncrasies of those who bought.
His Masters Voice
CORRECT HMV brought a new look to music buying, with a school within the store. ‘Bright’ young men from the country were encouraged to learn all the fine shades and nice feelings of their profession – how to satisfy varying music tastes, how to pronounce the names of foreign musicians, and generally to understand what they were selling and the idiosyncrasies of those who bought.
Columbia
WRONG HMV brought a new look to music buying, with a school within the store. ‘Bright’ young men from the country were encouraged to learn all the fine shades and nice feelings of their profession – how to satisfy varying music tastes, how to pronounce the names of foreign musicians, and generally to understand what they were selling and the idiosyncrasies of those who bought.