Tag Archives: Test Your Knowledge

Test Your Knowledge: July 2022

Sadiq Khan has recently been proposing that Havering should become an inner-city borough and Romford’s character as an Essex market town subsumed into the Metropolis. So this month’s quiz is about my home London borough, where curiously I still have an Essex address, despite paying council tax to a London authority. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. There are 32 London boroughs. How many, including Havering, begin with the letter H? (No need to list them – just need the number)
Three
WRONG Seven (unless you’re a Cockney who drops their Hs, in which case it’s zero). They are Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon and Hounslow.
Seven
CORRECT Seven (unless you’re a Cockney who drops their Hs, in which case it’s zero). They are Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon and Hounslow.
Nine
WRONG Seven (unless you’re a Cockney who drops their Hs, in which case it’s zero). They are Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon and Hounslow.
2. The London Borough of Havering was created in 1965 by the merger of the Municipal Borough of Romford, and which Essex urban district?
Upminster
WRONG Hornchurch, reputedly named after a church of ill repute – horn/church.
Hornchurch
CORRECT Hornchurch, reputedly named after a church of ill repute – horn/church.
Rainham
WRONG Hornchurch, reputedly named after a church of ill repute – horn/church.
3. What is unusual about the village of North Ockendon in the London Borough of Havering?
It’s the only inhabited area in Greater London outside the M25
CORRECT It’s outside the M25 — the only populated part of London to be free of Sadiq Khan’s ULEZ expansion proposals. Elizabeth Kucinich, the wife of the U.S. congressman and presidential candidate, was born in North Ockendon in 1977, her husband never was elected to that high office.
Traditionally cabbies won’t go there as it’s regarded as bad luck
WRONG It’s outside the M25 — the only populated part of London to be free of Sadiq Khan’s ULEZ expansion proposals. Elizabeth Kucinich, the wife of the U.S. congressman and presidential candidate, was born in North Ockendon in 1977, her husband never was elected to that high office.
A U.S. President’s wife was born there
WRONG It’s outside the M25 — the only populated part of London to be free of Sadiq Khan’s ULEZ expansion proposals. Elizabeth Kucinich, the wife of the U.S. congressman and presidential candidate, was born in North Ockendon in 1977, her husband never was elected to that high office.
4. The small village of Havering-atte-Bower is home to a stocks and whipping post – a very rare survival in London. Which famous politician visited in 2010, as attested by a nearby plaque?
Boris Johnson
CORRECT Boris Johnson, who was there to unveil an adjacent village sign.
Gordon Brown
WRONG Boris Johnson, who was there to unveil an adjacent village sign.
Ed Milliband
WRONG Boris Johnson, who was there to unveil an adjacent village sign.
5. At the entrance to Upminster Bridge Station, there is an unusual symbol on the floor. What is it?
Swastika
CORRECT The large swastika was put on the floor of Upminster Bridge station in 1934, one year after Hitler came to power.
Pentagram
WRONG The large swastika was put on the floor of Upminster Bridge station in 1934, one year after Hitler came to power.
Treble clef
WRONG The large swastika was put on the floor of Upminster Bridge station in 1934, one year after Hitler came to power.
6. Romford was granted a market by which Monarch?
Queen Victoria in 1847
WRONG The market originated as a sheep market in 1247. Under the Royal Charter of the Liberty of Havering, granted by King Henry III, no other market is permitted to set up within a day’s sheep drive (six and two-thirds miles) of Romford.
Henry III in 1247
CORRECT The market originated as a sheep market in 1247. Under the Royal Charter of the Liberty of Havering, granted by King Henry III, no other market is permitted to set up within a day’s sheep drive (six and two-thirds miles) of Romford.
Edward VI in 1547
WRONG The market originated as a sheep market in 1247. Under the Royal Charter of the Liberty of Havering, granted by King Henry III, no other market is permitted to set up within a day’s sheep drive (six and two-thirds miles) of Romford.
7. Ferry Lane, Rainham gave access to a ferry that once crossed the river, primarily for what purpose?
Taking cattle to better grazing on the south bank
WRONG For centuries until 1854, Ferry Lane, leading down to the River Thames south of Rainham, was the northern boarding point for a ferry that crossed the river, transporting pilgrims on their journey to Canterbury Cathedral.
To pick up Hansom carriages assembled in Erith at a factory located on Bronze Age Way
WRONG For centuries until 1854, Ferry Lane, leading down to the River Thames south of Rainham, was the northern boarding point for a ferry that crossed the river, transporting pilgrims on their journey to Canterbury Cathedral.
To transport pilgrims on their journey to Canterbury Cathedral
CORRECT For centuries until 1854, Ferry Lane, leading down to the River Thames south of Rainham, was the northern boarding point for a ferry that crossed the river, transporting pilgrims on their journey to Canterbury Cathedral.
8. What unique fixture can be seen at the east end of St Andrew’s Church roof, Hornchurch, where you might usually expect to find a cross?
A globe
WRONG A carving of the head of a horned bull (hence Hornchurch). A pineapple placed on buildings used to be a symbol of wealth and status as they weren’t grown anywhere in Europe, one can be found upon St. Paul’s Cathedral.
A pineapple
WRONG A carving of the head of a horned bull (hence Hornchurch). A pineapple placed on buildings used to be a symbol of wealth and status as they weren’t grown anywhere in Europe, one can be found upon St. Paul’s Cathedral.
A bull’s head
CORRECT A carving of the head of a horned bull (hence Hornchurch). A pineapple placed on buildings used to be a symbol of wealth and status as they weren’t grown anywhere in Europe, one can be found upon St. Paul’s Cathedral.
9. What stopped at Maywin Drive, just north of St. Andrews Church, Hornchurch?
The Ice Age advance
CORRECT In 1892 the Romford to Upminster branch line was constructed and an unexpected seam of boulder clay overlaid by sand and gravel was exposed. The Essex Field Club investigated and discovered several Jurassic fossils that could only have been carried from the Midlands by an ice sheet. Since then, with all of the construction taking place in London, no such glacial deposition has been found further south than Maywin Drive, Hornchurch.
The Peasants’ Revolt
WRONG In 1892 the Romford to Upminster branch line was constructed and an unexpected seam of boulder clay overlaid by sand and gravel was exposed. The Essex Field Club investigated and discovered several Jurassic fossils that could only have been carried from the Midlands by an ice sheet. Since then, with all of the construction taking place in London, no such glacial deposition has been found further south than Maywin Drive, Hornchurch.
The first Green Line bus
WRONG In 1892 the Romford to Upminster branch line was constructed and an unexpected seam of boulder clay overlaid by sand and gravel was exposed. The Essex Field Club investigated and discovered several Jurassic fossils that could only have been carried from the Midlands by an ice sheet. Since then, with all of the construction taking place in London, no such glacial deposition has been found further south than Maywin Drive, Hornchurch.
10. What unusual event occurred at Gallows Corner in 1932?
A meteorite landed
WRONG In 1932, a Metropolitan Police car collided with a cow at the junction. The animal was so badly injured it had to be destroyed. It was, in all probability, the last time the authorities had to sanction an execution at Gallows Corner.
A cow was executed
CORRECT In 1932, a Metropolitan Police car collided with a cow at the junction. The animal was so badly injured it had to be destroyed. It was, in all probability, the last time the authorities had to sanction an execution at Gallows Corner.
The locals declared self-rule for Romford
WRONG In 1932, a Metropolitan Police car collided with a cow at the junction. The animal was so badly injured it had to be destroyed. It was, in all probability, the last time the authorities had to sanction an execution at Gallows Corner.

Test Your Knowledge: June Jubilee

To commemorate the Jubilee, this month’s London quiz is shamelessly Royalist, should they wish, Republicans may reluctantly participate. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Who did Princess Anne marry at Westminster Abbey in 1973?
Brigadier Andrew Parker Bowles
WRONG Anne’s romance with Bowles was covered in The Crown’s third season, with Anne played by Erin Doherty. After marrying Mark Phillips in 1973 Anne later divorced to marry Timothy Lawrence.
Captain Mark Phillips
CORRECT Anne’s romance with Bowles was covered in The Crown’s third season, with Anne played by Erin Doherty. After marrying Mark Phillips in 1973 Anne later divorced to marry Timothy Lawrence.
Sir Timothy Lawrence
WRONG Anne’s romance with Bowles was covered in The Crown’s third season, with Anne played by Erin Doherty. After marrying Mark Phillips in 1973 Anne later divorced to marry Timothy Lawrence.
2. Where was Queen Elizabeth II born in 1926?
Buckingham Palace
WRONG Not a palace, a big estate or even a hospital, but a townhouse on a busy London street. The Queen’s parents had moved into the house, belonging to her Scottish grandparents, the Earl and Countess of Strathmore, only a few weeks before her birth. Demolished in 1937, along with 20 neighbouring houses, 17 Bruton Street was replaced with Berkeley Square House which was considered Europe’s largest office block and one of London’s first major reinforced concrete buildings.
17 Bruton Street
CORRECT Not a palace, a big estate or even a hospital, but a townhouse on a busy London street. The Queen’s parents had moved into the house, belonging to her Scottish grandparents, the Earl and Countess of Strathmore, only a few weeks before her birth. Demolished in 1937, along with 20 neighbouring houses, 17 Bruton Street was replaced with Berkeley Square House which was considered Europe’s largest office block and one of London’s first major reinforced concrete buildings.
Royal Lodge, Windsor
WRONG Not a palace, a big estate or even a hospital, but a townhouse on a busy London street. The Queen’s parents had moved into the house, belonging to her Scottish grandparents, the Earl and Countess of Strathmore, only a few weeks before her birth. Demolished in 1937, along with 20 neighbouring houses, 17 Bruton Street was replaced with Berkeley Square House which was considered Europe’s largest office block and one of London’s first major reinforced concrete buildings.
3. Who was the only monarch to be born and die at Buckingham Palace?
Edward VII
CORRECT Edward VII was born at Buckingham Palace on 9th November 1841 he died at the Palace on 6th May 1910 aged 68, he lay in state at Westminster Hall, where a quarter of a million people filed past his body. On 20th May he was buried in St George’s Chapel, Windsor.
George VI
WRONG Edward VII was born at Buckingham Palace on 9th November 1841 he died at the Palace on 6th May 1910 aged 68, he lay in state at Westminster Hall, where a quarter of a million people filed past his body. On 20th May he was buried in St George’s Chapel, Windsor.
Queen Victoria
WRONG Edward VII was born at Buckingham Palace on 9th November 1841 he died at the Palace on 6th May 1910 aged 68, he lay in state at Westminster Hall, where a quarter of a million people filed past his body. On 20th May he was buried in St George’s Chapel, Windsor.
4. Before he came to the throne, George VI competed in which sporting tournament?
Wimbledon Tennis Championship
CORRECT The Duke of York, the future King George VI, remains the only member of the British royal family to ever compete at Wimbledon after playing in the men’s doubles tournament. Partnering with his mentor and advisor Louis Greig, the pair were eliminated in the first round by former champions Herbert Roper Barrett and Arthur Gore.
British Golf Open
WRONG The Duke of York, the future King George VI, remains the only member of the British royal family to ever compete at Wimbledon after playing in the men’s doubles tournament. Partnering with his mentor and advisor Louis Greig, the pair were eliminated in the first round by former champions Herbert Roper Barrett and Arthur Gore.
Cricket Test Match
WRONG The Duke of York, the future King George VI, remains the only member of the British royal family to ever compete at Wimbledon after playing in the men’s doubles tournament. Partnering with his mentor and advisor Louis Greig, the pair were eliminated in the first round by former champions Herbert Roper Barrett and Arthur Gore.
5. What shape was Queen Anne’s coffin?
Square
CORRECT After suffering 17 miscarriages and poor health, when she died in 1714, aged 49, she was placed in a coffin described by one onlooker as so wide it was “almost square”, and “bigger than that of the prince, her husband, who was known to be a fat, bulky man”. It was taken to Westminster Abbey by a chariot with particularly “large, strong wheels”, drawn by eight horses draped in purple, where it was then carried inside by no less than 14 men. Some even claim the coffin didn’t fit inside the Stuart vault, under the floor at the south aisle of Henry VII’s chapel, and that other royal coffins had to be moved to accommodate it.
Oval
WRONG After suffering 17 miscarriages and poor health, when she died in 1714, aged 49, she was placed in a coffin described by one onlooker as so wide it was “almost square”, and “bigger than that of the prince, her husband, who was known to be a fat, bulky man”. It was taken to Westminster Abbey by a chariot with particularly “large, strong wheels”, drawn by eight horses draped in purple, where it was then carried inside by no less than 14 men. Some even claim the coffin didn’t fit inside the Stuart vault, under the floor at the south aisle of Henry VII’s chapel, and that other royal coffins had to be moved to accommodate it.
Oblong
WRONG After suffering 17 miscarriages and poor health, when she died in 1714, aged 49, she was placed in a coffin described by one onlooker as so wide it was “almost square”, and “bigger than that of the prince, her husband, who was known to be a fat, bulky man”. It was taken to Westminster Abbey by a chariot with particularly “large, strong wheels”, drawn by eight horses draped in purple, where it was then carried inside by no less than 14 men. Some even claim the coffin didn’t fit inside the Stuart vault, under the floor at the south aisle of Henry VII’s chapel, and that other royal coffins had to be moved to accommodate it.
6. The Banqueting House is the last remaining part of which central London palace destroyed by fire in 1698?
Nonsuch Palace
WRONG The palace has (mostly) gone but its name lives on as a synonym for the national government quarter. Banqueting House is notable for being the first Palladian neo-classical building completed in England. It was through a window that King Charles I stepped onto a stage to be beheaded publicly in 1649.
Whitehall Palace
CORRECT The palace has (mostly) gone but its name lives on as a synonym for the national government quarter. Banqueting House is notable for being the first Palladian neo-classical building completed in England. It was through a window that King Charles I stepped onto a stage to be beheaded publicly in 1649.
Winchester Palace
WRONG The palace has (mostly) gone but its name lives on as a synonym for the national government quarter. Banqueting House is notable for being the first Palladian neo-classical building completed in England. It was through a window that King Charles I stepped onto a stage to be beheaded publicly in 1649.
7. Which London palace was used extensively to raise royal children from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries?
Winchester Palace
WRONG Eltham is something of a hidden gem. Its fifteenth-century hall dates from King Edward IV’s reign, who considered this his favourite palace. Buildings, gardens and hunting grounds had been extended in the fourteenth century by Edward II and his wife Isabella for their son (Edward III). Henry VIII spent much of his boyhood here in the late fifteenth century.
Kensington Palace
WRONG Eltham is something of a hidden gem. Its fifteenth-century hall dates from King Edward IV’s reign, who considered this his favourite palace. Buildings, gardens and hunting grounds had been extended in the fourteenth century by Edward II and his wife Isabella for their son (Edward III). Henry VIII spent much of his boyhood here in the late fifteenth century.
Eltham Palace
CORRECT Eltham is something of a hidden gem. Its fifteenth-century hall dates from King Edward IV’s reign, who considered this his favourite palace. Buildings, gardens and hunting grounds had been extended in the fourteenth century by Edward II and his wife Isabella for their son (Edward III). Henry VIII spent much of his boyhood here in the late fifteenth century.
8. During World War II, Buckingham Palace suffered nine direct bomb hits. Which part of the building was destroyed?
Music Room
WRONG Believed to have been a deliberate target, the most serious damage to the palace destroyed the chapel, George VI and Queen Elizabeth were filmed inspecting the site. It was during this time that the always classy Queen said, “Now I can look the East End in the face.” Since the bombing of the chapel, some royal christenings have taken place in the Music Room.
Ballroom
WRONG Believed to have been a deliberate target, the most serious damage to the palace destroyed the chapel, George VI and Queen Elizabeth were filmed inspecting the site. It was during this time that the always classy Queen said, “Now I can look the East End in the face.” Since the bombing of the chapel, some royal christenings have taken place in the Music Room.
Chapel
CORRECT Believed to have been a deliberate target, the most serious damage to the palace destroyed the chapel, George VI and Queen Elizabeth were filmed inspecting the site. It was during this time that the always classy Queen said, “Now I can look the East End in the face.” Since the bombing of the chapel, some royal christenings have taken place in the Music Room.
9. One of these IS NOT in Buckingham Palace, but which one?
A travel agents
CORRECT Buckingham Palace doesn’t have a travel agent. In 2001, the now-former head of Coutts bank, Gordon Pell, confirmed that there is indeed an ATM inside Buckingham Palace. It is tucked away in the Palace basement and reserved for the royal family. The Court Postmaster, David Baxter, is only the 29th person to hold this important position since its formation in 1565 when Robert Gascoigne became the first holder of the office providing all the services you expect from your local post office.
A post office
WRONG Buckingham Palace doesn’t have a travel agent. In 2001, the now-former head of Coutts bank, Gordon Pell, confirmed that there is indeed an ATM inside Buckingham Palace. It is tucked away in the Palace basement and reserved for the royal family. The Court Postmaster, David Baxter, is only the 29th person to hold this important position since its formation in 1565 when Robert Gascoigne became the first holder of the office providing all the services you expect from your local post office.
An ATM
WRONG Buckingham Palace doesn’t have a travel agent. In 2001, the now-former head of Coutts bank, Gordon Pell, confirmed that there is indeed an ATM inside Buckingham Palace. It is tucked away in the Palace basement and reserved for the royal family. The Court Postmaster, David Baxter, is only the 29th person to hold this important position since its formation in 1565 when Robert Gascoigne became the first holder of the office providing all the services you expect from your local post office.
10. The Trial of the Pyx is an annual Royal interrogation. What is examined?
That the House of Windsor is entitled to be our Royal family
WRONG The Trial of the Pyx examines, tests and weighs several coins to make sure that they are all consistent and meet the specifications set out in the relevant section of the Coinage Act or Royal Proclamation. The Trial usually takes place in January or February at Goldsmith’s in London every year and is thought to be the only Mint that conducts such a test.
Where several coins are tested as to their authenticity
CORRECT The Trial of the Pyx examines, tests and weighs several coins to make sure that they are all consistent and meet the specifications set out in the relevant section of the Coinage Act or Royal Proclamation. The Trial usually takes place in January or February at Goldsmith’s in London every year and is thought to be the only Mint that conducts such a test.
That the army is required to demonstrate their allegiance to the Crown
WRONG The Trial of the Pyx examines, tests and weighs several coins to make sure that they are all consistent and meet the specifications set out in the relevant section of the Coinage Act or Royal Proclamation. The Trial usually takes place in January or February at Goldsmith’s in London every year and is thought to be the only Mint that conducts such a test.

Test Your Knowledge: May 2022

This month’s quiz is about London numbers. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. What were the ‘seven sisters’ from which Seven Sisters Road takes its name?
Seven spinsters
WRONG Hundreds of years ago seven elm trees were planted around a walnut tree for reasons which have been lost in time. The trees appear on a map of 1619 though some believe that the original seven trees were planted as long ago as 1350. The seven trees have been replanted a number of times, always by seven sisters but they are now in a slightly different location to the earliest plantings.
Seven elm trees
CORRECT Hundreds of years ago seven elm trees were planted around a walnut tree for reasons which have been lost in time. The trees appear on a map of 1619 though some believe that the original seven trees were planted as long ago as 1350. The seven trees have been replanted a number of times, always by seven sisters but they are now in a slightly different location to the earliest plantings.
Seven churches
WRONG Hundreds of years ago seven elm trees were planted around a walnut tree for reasons which have been lost in time. The trees appear on a map of 1619 though some believe that the original seven trees were planted as long ago as 1350. The seven trees have been replanted a number of times, always by seven sisters but they are now in a slightly different location to the earliest plantings.
2. The sign at Belsize Park Underground Station says that there are 219 steps at the station. It is wrong, how many are there?
179 steps
WRONG Belsize Park Station has a sign claiming there are 219 steps when there are in fact just 189. Does Transport for London have a step counter who can’t count? Do they want to put people off using the stairs.
189 steps
CORRECT Belsize Park Station has a sign claiming there are 219 steps when there are in fact just 189. Does Transport for London have a step counter who can’t count? Do they want to put people off using the stairs.
199 steps
WRONG Belsize Park Station has a sign claiming there are 219 steps when there are in fact just 189. Does Transport for London have a step counter who can’t count? Do they want to put people off using the stairs.
3. The Prime Meridian famously passes through Greenwich. How many European countries (including the UK) does it run through?
Three
CORRECT Three (UK, France and Spain) this imaginary line which runs from the North Pole to the South Pole also passes through Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Togo, Ghana and Antarctica.
Five
WRONG Three (UK, France and Spain) this imaginary line which runs from the North Pole to the South Pole also passes through Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Togo, Ghana and Antarctica.
Seven
WRONG Three (UK, France and Spain) this imaginary line which runs from the North Pole to the South Pole also passes through Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Togo, Ghana and Antarctica.
4. How many times does The Elizabeth Line cross under the Thames?
One
CORRECT A new tunnel was bored underneath the Thames between Plumstead and North Woolwich, stretching for almost 2 miles, the Thames Tunnel lays about 50ft below the existing river bed.
Two
WRONG A new tunnel was bored underneath the Thames between Plumstead and North Woolwich, stretching for almost 2 miles, the Thames Tunnel lays about 50ft below the existing river bed.
Three
WRONG A new tunnel was bored underneath the Thames between Plumstead and North Woolwich, stretching for almost 2 miles, the Thames Tunnel lays about 50ft below the existing river bed.
5. Number 133 High Holborn was better known by what name until 1933?
British Museum tube station
CORRECT The British Museum Station was opened by the Central London Railway known the Twopenny Tube in 1900. In 1933, with the expansion of Holborn Station less than 100 yards away, British Museum station was permanently closed. It was subsequently utilised as a military office and command post, but in 1989 the surface building was demolished.
Gamages
WRONG The British Museum Station was opened by the Central London Railway known the Twopenny Tube in 1900. In 1933, with the expansion of Holborn Station less than 100 yards away, British Museum station was permanently closed. It was subsequently utilised as a military office and command post, but in 1989 the surface building was demolished.
The Prudential Insurance Headquarters
WRONG The British Museum Station was opened by the Central London Railway known the Twopenny Tube in 1900. In 1933, with the expansion of Holborn Station less than 100 yards away, British Museum station was permanently closed. It was subsequently utilised as a military office and command post, but in 1989 the surface building was demolished.
6. Whose house, now a museum, was popularly known as Number 1, London in the 19th century?
Robert Peel
WRONG The original house was built on the site in 1778, for Lord Apsley, and the house was the first one on the north side of Piccadilly. At the time, it was next to the main turnpike or toll into central London, so became known as ‘Number 1, London’, because it was the first house you came to when you entered London. The property’s official address today is 149 Piccadilly, Hyde Park Corner, London W1J 7NT, but rumours still abound that if you posted a letter to ‘Number 1, London’ it would reach this address.
Duke of Wellington
CORRECT The original house was built on the site in 1778, for Lord Apsley, and the house was the first one on the north side of Piccadilly. At the time, it was next to the main turnpike or toll into central London, so became known as ‘Number 1, London’, because it was the first house you came to when you entered London. The property’s official address today is 149 Piccadilly, Hyde Park Corner, London W1J 7NT, but rumours still abound that if you posted a letter to ‘Number 1, London’ it would reach this address.
Benjamin Disraeli
WRONG The original house was built on the site in 1778, for Lord Apsley, and the house was the first one on the north side of Piccadilly. At the time, it was next to the main turnpike or toll into central London, so became known as ‘Number 1, London’, because it was the first house you came to when you entered London. The property’s official address today is 149 Piccadilly, Hyde Park Corner, London W1J 7NT, but rumours still abound that if you posted a letter to ‘Number 1, London’ it would reach this address.
7. There are 32 London boroughs. How many begin with the letter H?
Three
WRONG Seven (unless you’re a Cockney who drops their Hs, in which case it’s zero). They are Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon and Hounslow.
Five
WRONG Seven (unless you’re a Cockney who drops their Hs, in which case it’s zero). They are Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon and Hounslow.
Seven
CORRECT Seven (unless you’re a Cockney who drops their Hs, in which case it’s zero). They are Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon and Hounslow.
8. In 1977, Londoner Marie White became the first woman to do what?
Become Lord-lieutenant of The Tower of London
WRONG Remarkably the first woman to have completed the modern Knowledge of London to become an All London Green Badge driver was not until 1977 when Marie White (badge 25292) passed. She would regularly be seen on the St. Pancras rank with her little border terrier dog in the luggage compartment.
Drive a London Underground train
WRONG Remarkably the first woman to have completed the modern Knowledge of London to become an All London Green Badge driver was not until 1977 when Marie White (badge 25292) passed. She would regularly be seen on the St. Pancras rank with her little border terrier dog in the luggage compartment.
Qualify as a black cabbie
CORRECT Remarkably the first woman to have completed the modern Knowledge of London to become an All London Green Badge driver was not until 1977 when Marie White (badge 25292) passed. She would regularly be seen on the St. Pancras rank with her little border terrier dog in the luggage compartment.
9. How many floors are underground in the MI6 Headquarters?
Five
CORRECT The MI6 headquarters was blown up in two James Bond films (The World is Not Enough and Skyfall), and then demolished in Spectre. The exterior used in the movies is actually the real MI6 building, which is pretty safe since the main part of the building has five floors underground.
Three
WRONG The MI6 headquarters was blown up in two James Bond films (The World is Not Enough and Skyfall), and then demolished in Spectre. The exterior used in the movies is actually the real MI6 building, which is pretty safe since the main part of the building has five floors underground.
One
WRONG The MI6 headquarters was blown up in two James Bond films (The World is Not Enough and Skyfall), and then demolished in Spectre. The exterior used in the movies is actually the real MI6 building, which is pretty safe since the main part of the building has five floors underground.
10. How many rooms are there in Buckingham Palace?
575
WRONG Buckingham Palace has 775 rooms. These include 19 State rooms, 52 Royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms.
775
CORRECT Buckingham Palace has 775 rooms. These include 19 State rooms, 52 Royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms.
675
WRONG Buckingham Palace has 775 rooms. These include 19 State rooms, 52 Royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms.

Test Your Knowledge: April 2022

This month’s quiz is about music, depending upon your age the questions will either get easier or harder. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Which one of the following English-born composers wrote ‘A London Symphony’?
Benjamin Britten
WRONG Vaughan Williams’ London Symphony has references mimicked by the orchestra to the urban soundscape: a barrel organ, the chant of a lavender-seller; the jingle of hansom cabs and the chimes of Big Ben.
Ralph Vaughan Williams
CORRECT Vaughan Williams’ London Symphony has references mimicked by the orchestra to the urban soundscape: a barrel organ, the chant of a lavender-seller; the jingle of hansom cabs and the chimes of Big Ben.
Edward Elgar
WRONG Vaughan Williams’ London Symphony has references mimicked by the orchestra to the urban soundscape: a barrel organ, the chant of a lavender-seller; the jingle of hansom cabs and the chimes of Big Ben.
2. Which wartime song was written by Hubert Gregg?
Lambeth Walk
WRONG As he sat and watched German V1 bombers fly over London, Hubert Gregg sat and composed the well-known Cockney folk song, Maybe It’s Because I’m a Londoner in a little over 20 minutes.
Maybe It’s Because I’m a Londoner
CORRECT As he sat and watched German V1 bombers fly over London, Hubert Gregg sat and composed the well-known Cockney folk song, Maybe It’s Because I’m a Londoner in a little over 20 minutes.
A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square
WRONG As he sat and watched German V1 bombers fly over London, Hubert Gregg sat and composed the well-known Cockney folk song, Maybe It’s Because I’m a Londoner in a little over 20 minutes.
3. Which London bridge is featured on a Kinks 1967 song?
Waterloo Bridge
CORRECT One morning in February 1967, Ray Davies rolled out of bed in his little semi-detached house in North London, and there was a song waiting for him. He claimed Waterloo Sunset came to him in a dream. He originally titled the song Liverpool Sunset.
London Bridge
WRONG One morning in February 1967, Ray Davies rolled out of bed in his little semi-detached house in North London, and there was a song waiting for him. He claimed Waterloo Sunset came to him in a dream. He originally titled the song Liverpool Sunset.
Tower Bridge
WRONG One morning in February 1967, Ray Davies rolled out of bed in his little semi-detached house in North London, and there was a song waiting for him. He claimed Waterloo Sunset came to him in a dream. He originally titled the song Liverpool Sunset.
4. What is the name of the street featured on the cover of their iconic 1969 album?
Abbey Road
CORRECT For the first time on a Beatles album, the front cover contained neither the group’s name nor the album title just that iconic photograph taken on the zebra crossing near the entrance to the Abbey Road Studios in August 1969.
Abbey Place
WRONG For the first time on a Beatles album, the front cover contained neither the group’s name nor the album title just that iconic photograph taken on the zebra crossing near the entrance to the Abbey Road Studios in August 1969.
Abbey Street
WRONG For the first time on a Beatles album, the front cover contained neither the group’s name nor the album title just that iconic photograph taken on the zebra crossing near the entrance to the Abbey Road Studios in August 1969.
5. Who are the group that sang ‘London Calling’?
The Clash
CORRECT London Calling is the third studio album by The Clash, it was originally released as a double album in the United Kingdom on 14 December 1979 by CBS Records.
Dire Straits
WRONG London Calling is the third studio album by The Clash, it was originally released as a double album in the United Kingdom on 14 December 1979 by CBS Records.
Pink Floyd
WRONG London Calling is the third studio album by The Clash, it was originally released as a double album in the United Kingdom on 14 December 1979 by CBS Records.
6. George Michael infamously crashed his Range Rover into the Hampstead branch of what high street shop?
Wex Photo
WRONG George Michael’s drug-induced Snappy Snaps crash Range Rover was later sold on eBay for a staggering £65,900.
Snappy Snaps
CORRECT George Michael’s drug-induced Snappy Snaps crash Range Rover was later sold on eBay for a staggering £65,900.
London Camera Exchange
WRONG George Michael’s drug-induced Snappy Snaps crash Range Rover was later sold on eBay for a staggering £65,900.
7. Coldplay band members met for the first time at which London University?
London School of Economics
WRONG They met at UCL and began playing music together from 1996 to 1998, first calling themselves Pectoralz and then Starfish before finally changing their name to Coldplay.
London South Bank University
WRONG They met at UCL and began playing music together from 1996 to 1998, first calling themselves Pectoralz and then Starfish before finally changing their name to Coldplay.
University College London
CORRECT They met at UCL and began playing music together from 1996 to 1998, first calling themselves Pectoralz and then Starfish before finally changing their name to Coldplay.
8. In what London neighbourhood would you find a statue of Amy Winehouse?
Hackney
WRONG The location of Amy Winehouse’s statue was originally intended in the Roundhouse music venue in nearby Chalk Farm, but due to poor public accessibility at that site, the work was instead erected in the Stables Market, it was unveiled by Winehouse’s friend, the Barbara Windsor on 14th September 2014, which would have been the singer’s 31st birthday.
Finchley
WRONG The location of Amy Winehouse’s statue was originally intended in the Roundhouse music venue in nearby Chalk Farm, but due to poor public accessibility at that site, the work was instead erected in the Stables Market, it was unveiled by Winehouse’s friend, the Barbara Windsor on 14th September 2014, which would have been the singer’s 31st birthday.
Camden
CORRECT The location of Amy Winehouse’s statue was originally intended in the Roundhouse music venue in nearby Chalk Farm, but due to poor public accessibility at that site, the work was instead erected in the Stables Market, it was unveiled by Winehouse’s friend, the Barbara Windsor on 14th September 2014, which would have been the singer’s 31st birthday.
9. In the song ‘Good Life’ by One Republic where do the authors find themselves in London?
Piccadilly
CORRECT Original Lyrics: Woke up in London yesterday/Found myself in the city, near Piccadilly. This 2010 multi-platinum song is unique in that the band recorded various radio versions of this song for different cities and states. The line changed in the lyrics is “my friends in [city/state] they don’t know, where I’ve been.”.
Mayfair
WRONG Original Lyrics: Woke up in London yesterday/Found myself in the city, near Piccadilly. This 2010 multi-platinum song is unique in that the band recorded various radio versions of this song for different cities and states. The line changed in the lyrics is “my friends in [city/state] they don’t know, where I’ve been.”.
Soho
WRONG Original Lyrics: Woke up in London yesterday/Found myself in the city, near Piccadilly. This 2010 multi-platinum song is unique in that the band recorded various radio versions of this song for different cities and states. The line changed in the lyrics is “my friends in [city/state] they don’t know, where I’ve been.”.
10. Taylor Swift sang about Hackney, Highgate and Hampstead in which song?
London Girl
WRONG Fans thought London Boy refers to visiting Camden Market, Highgate, the West End, Brixton, Shoreditch, Hackney and Bond Street in a single day falling in love with Londoner, her partner Joe Alwyn. She later clarified that she sang of over a three year period.
London Boy
CORRECT Fans thought London Boy refers to visiting Camden Market, Highgate, the West End, Brixton, Shoreditch, Hackney and Bond Street in a single day falling in love with Londoner, her partner Joe Alwyn. She later clarified that she sang of over a three year period.
London Park
WRONG Fans thought London Boy refers to visiting Camden Market, Highgate, the West End, Brixton, Shoreditch, Hackney and Bond Street in a single day falling in love with Londoner, her partner Joe Alwyn. She later clarified that she sang of over a three year period.

Test Your Knowledge: March 2022

Claiming something to be the ‘oldest’ is often fraught with problems, so bear with me on what I think are the correct answers. As with the previous Quizzes, the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Britain’s oldest door can be found in which religious building in London?
Westminster Abbey
CORRECT Westminster Abbey has Britain’s oldest door, dated for the first time in 2005 by the process known as dendrochronology, it showed the wood had been felled after 1032 and the door constructed sometime in the 1050s during the reign of King Edward the Confessor.
Tower of London
WRONG Westminster Abbey has Britain’s oldest door, dated for the first time in 2005 by the process known as dendrochronology, it showed the wood had been felled after 1032 and the door constructed sometime in the 1050s during the reign of King Edward the Confessor.
Fulham Palace
WRONG Westminster Abbey has Britain’s oldest door, dated for the first time in 2005 by the process known as dendrochronology, it showed the wood had been felled after 1032 and the door constructed sometime in the 1050s during the reign of King Edward the Confessor.
2. What is the capital’s oldest mainline train station in Zone One?
Kings Cross
WRONG London Bridge station was opened in December 1836. Kings Cross was opened in 1852 and named after a huge statue of much-derided statue of George IV, removed in 1842. Charing Cross Station was named after a short street near the notional centre of London from which distances from the city are measured and opened in 1864.
London Bridge
CORRECT London Bridge station was opened in December 1836. Kings Cross was opened in 1852 and named after a huge statue of much-derided statue of George IV, removed in 1842. Charing Cross Station was named after a short street near the notional centre of London from which distances from the city are measured and opened in 1864.
Charing Cross
WRONG London Bridge station was opened in December 1836. Kings Cross was opened in 1852 and named after a huge statue of much-derided statue of George IV, removed in 1842. Charing Cross Station was named after a short street near the notional centre of London from which distances from the city are measured and opened in 1864.
3. Which restaurant claims to be London’s oldest?
Rules
CORRECT Established in 1798, Rules is regarded as London’s oldest restaurant. Edward, The Prince of Wales would entertain his mistresses there in a secret room. Established in 1889, Sweetings is London’s oldest seafood restaurant, apparently gangster George Francis once offered one-time owner George Needham £1,000,000 in cash for the restaurant. Wiltons began life as an oyster stall in 1742 before its establishment in St James in the 1840s, they proudly announced in 2017 that it was older than America.
Wiltons
WRONG Established in 1798, Rules is regarded as London’s oldest restaurant. Edward, The Prince of Wales would entertain his mistresses there in a secret room. Established in 1889, Sweetings is London’s oldest seafood restaurant, apparently gangster George Francis once offered one-time owner George Needham £1,000,000 in cash for the restaurant. Wiltons began life as an oyster stall in 1742 before its establishment in St James in the 1840s, they proudly announced in 2017 that it was older than America.
Sweetings
WRONG Established in 1798, Rules is regarded as London’s oldest restaurant. Edward, The Prince of Wales would entertain his mistresses there in a secret room. Established in 1889, Sweetings is London’s oldest seafood restaurant, apparently gangster George Francis once offered one-time owner George Needham £1,000,000 in cash for the restaurant. Wiltons began life as an oyster stall in 1742 before its establishment in St James in the 1840s, they proudly announced in 2017 that it was older than America.
4. Some of the world’s earliest shops can be found in London, but which is the oldest?
Lock & Co
CORRECT Curiously all three are near each other. Lock & Co founded in 1676 is the oldest hatter in the world who invented the bowler. Berry Brothers are next door and have been supplying fine wines since 1698. Founded by a saddler and whip maker in 1750, Swaine Adeney Brigg has been selling leather goods for centuries, supplying luggage for films including the Kingsman movies.
Berry Brothers & Rudd
WRONG Curiously all three are near each other. Lock & Co founded in 1676 is the oldest hatter in the world who invented the bowler. Berry Brothers are next door and have been supplying fine wines since 1698. Founded by a saddler and whip maker in 1750, Swaine Adeney Brigg has been selling leather goods for centuries, supplying luggage for films including the Kingsman movies.
Swaine Adeney Brigg
WRONG Curiously all three are near each other. Lock & Co founded in 1676 is the oldest hatter in the world who invented the bowler. Berry Brothers are next door and have been supplying fine wines since 1698. Founded by a saddler and whip maker in 1750, Swaine Adeney Brigg has been selling leather goods for centuries, supplying luggage for films including the Kingsman movies.
5. We’ve more statues than you could shake a stick at, but which is the oldest?
King Alfred the Great in Trinity Church Square
CORRECT Created in the 14th century in honour of King Alfred, the man who ruled Wessex in the 9th century was originally located at the Palace of Westminster before it was brought to its present location in 1823 at about the time the square was being laid. Credited as being London’s oldest equestrian bronze, King Charles I statue is used to measure all distances from London. Queen Elizabeth I dates from 1586 and was created during her reign.
King Charles I sitting astride his horse on the southern side of Trafalgar Square
WRONG Created in the 14th century in honour of King Alfred, the man who ruled Wessex in the 9th century was originally located at the Palace of Westminster before it was brought to its present location in 1823 at about the time the square was being laid. Credited as being London’s oldest equestrian bronze, King Charles I statue is used to measure all distances from London. Queen Elizabeth I dates from 1586 and was created during her reign.
Queen Elizabeth I standing on the facade of St Dunstan-in-the-West in Fleet Street
WRONG Created in the 14th century in honour of King Alfred, the man who ruled Wessex in the 9th century was originally located at the Palace of Westminster before it was brought to its present location in 1823 at about the time the square was being laid. Credited as being London’s oldest equestrian bronze, King Charles I statue is used to measure all distances from London. Queen Elizabeth I dates from 1586 and was created during her reign.
6. Where is what’s claimed to be London’s oldest house?
Mayesbrooke Road, Barking
WRONG Estimated to have been first built in 1435 this house was known as Walthamstow Tony. Sadly, this isn’t after a 15th century East London ‘Tone’ living in Walthamstow, but the name probably derives from the combination of a Saxon landowner ‘Waltheof’ and the name of a French nobleman called Ralph de Toni. Hidden down a small street in Farringdon lies 41/42 Cloth Fair, built between 1597 and 1614, this is the only house in the City of London to have survived the Great Fire of London. Was the Gunpowder Plot hatched at Eastbury Manor House, Mayesbrooke Road, Barking built in 1557? So says a local tradition supported by the author Daniel Defoe.
Cloth Fair, Smithfield
WRONG Estimated to have been first built in 1435 this house was known as Walthamstow Tony. Sadly, this isn’t after a 15th century East London ‘Tone’ living in Walthamstow, but the name probably derives from the combination of a Saxon landowner ‘Waltheof’ and the name of a French nobleman called Ralph de Toni. Hidden down a small street in Farringdon lies 41/42 Cloth Fair, built between 1597 and 1614, this is the only house in the City of London to have survived the Great Fire of London. Was the Gunpowder Plot hatched at Eastbury Manor House, Mayesbrooke Road, Barking built in 1557? So says a local tradition supported by the author Daniel Defoe.
Church Lane, Walthamstow
CORRECT Estimated to have been first built in 1435 this house was known as Walthamstow Tony. Sadly, this isn’t after a 15th century East London ‘Tone’ living in Walthamstow, but the name probably derives from the combination of a Saxon landowner ‘Waltheof’ and the name of a French nobleman called Ralph de Toni. Hidden down a small street in Farringdon lies 41/42 Cloth Fair, built between 1597 and 1614, this is the only house in the City of London to have survived the Great Fire of London. Was the Gunpowder Plot hatched at Eastbury Manor House, Mayesbrooke Road, Barking built in 1557? So says a local tradition supported by the author Daniel Defoe.
7. You can still worship in London’s oldest Christian church, but which one?
St. Bartholomew-the-Great
WRONG Believed to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in England, St. Pancras Old Church was established around the 4th century, on the site of a former Roman temple. St Bartholomew-the-Great in Smithfield might be the oldest intact continuous place of worship, dating back to 1123. Some parts of the original building remain. All Hallows dates back to 625, but very little of the original structure remains.
All Hallows by the Tower
WRONG Believed to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in England, St. Pancras Old Church was established around the 4th century, on the site of a former Roman temple. St Bartholomew-the-Great in Smithfield might be the oldest intact continuous place of worship, dating back to 1123. Some parts of the original building remain. All Hallows dates back to 625, but very little of the original structure remains.
St. Pancras Old Church
CORRECT Believed to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in England, St. Pancras Old Church was established around the 4th century, on the site of a former Roman temple. St Bartholomew-the-Great in Smithfield might be the oldest intact continuous place of worship, dating back to 1123. Some parts of the original building remain. All Hallows dates back to 625, but very little of the original structure remains.
8. Love it, or loathe it, can you identify the oldest actress to appear on BBC’s Eastenders?
Barbara Windsor
WRONG June Brown joined the show in 1985, the year it was created, and stayed until January 2020, playing Dot Cotton the chain-smoking, quick-witted and loveable character who left the square in 2020 aged 94. Gretchen Franklin played Ethel Skinner’s final scenes at the age of 89, marking the end of her acting career. The late Barbara Winsor was a mere 79 years old when she left The Vic.
Gretchen Franklin
WRONG June Brown joined the show in 1985, the year it was created, and stayed until January 2020, playing Dot Cotton the chain-smoking, quick-witted and loveable character who left the square in 2020 aged 94. Gretchen Franklin played Ethel Skinner’s final scenes at the age of 89, marking the end of her acting career. The late Barbara Winsor was a mere 79 years old when she left The Vic.
June Brown
CORRECT June Brown joined the show in 1985, the year it was created, and stayed until January 2020, playing Dot Cotton the chain-smoking, quick-witted and loveable character who left the square in 2020 aged 94. Gretchen Franklin played Ethel Skinner’s final scenes at the age of 89, marking the end of her acting career. The late Barbara Winsor was a mere 79 years old when she left The Vic.
9. Have you watched a match at London’s oldest football club?
Fulham
CORRECT Their formation in 1879 make Fulham the oldest professional club in London and the second oldest in the world. The oldest senior non-league club is thought to be Cray Wanderers, founded in 1860, currently playing in Bromley.
Chelsea
WRONG Their formation in 1879 make Fulham the oldest professional club in London and the second oldest in the world. The oldest senior non-league club is thought to be Cray Wanderers, founded in 1860, currently playing in Bromley.
Arsenal
WRONG Their formation in 1879 make Fulham the oldest professional club in London and the second oldest in the world. The oldest senior non-league club is thought to be Cray Wanderers, founded in 1860, currently playing in Bromley.
10. Noted for its quintessential squares, but which is London’s oldest?
Charterhouse
WRONG The earliest squares were little more than open grass, surrounded by timber fences. The first square to have a properly laid out garden at its centre was probably Soho Square built in 1681 by the Earl of Macclesfield. Did you know? The body of Oliver Cromwell is said to lie beneath Red Lion Square, dug up from Westminster Abbey in 1666 and dumped in unconsecrated ground.
Soho
CORRECT The earliest squares were little more than open grass, surrounded by timber fences. The first square to have a properly laid out garden at its centre was probably Soho Square built in 1681 by the Earl of Macclesfield. Did you know? The body of Oliver Cromwell is said to lie beneath Red Lion Square, dug up from Westminster Abbey in 1666 and dumped in unconsecrated ground.
Red Lion
WRONG The earliest squares were little more than open grass, surrounded by timber fences. The first square to have a properly laid out garden at its centre was probably Soho Square built in 1681 by the Earl of Macclesfield. Did you know? The body of Oliver Cromwell is said to lie beneath Red Lion Square, dug up from Westminster Abbey in 1666 and dumped in unconsecrated ground.