Tag Archives: Test Your Knowledge

Test Your Knowledge: February

Ihope you enjoyed January’s questions and even managed to answer a few. This month’s quiz is about last in London. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Where is the last remaining tollgate in London?
College Road, Dulwich
CORRECT The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
Well Walk, Hampstead
WRONG The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
Strand on the Green, Chiswick
WRONG The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
2. Who was the last person to be executed in the Tower of London?
Henry Laurens, an American spy during the Revolutionary War
WRONG Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
Josef Jakobs, a German spy during the Second World War
CORRECT Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
Carl Lody, a German spy during the First World War
WRONG Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
3. Where did the last London tram run to on 6 July 1952?
New Cross
CORRECT The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
Elephant and Castle
WRONG The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
Woolwich
WRONG The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
4. In the 1950s the Thames was declared biologically dead. How many fish species are there today?
Less than 50
WRONG In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
Between 50 and 100
WRONG In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
More than 120
CORRECT In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
5. Which London theatre, known as a writers’ theatre, led to the abolition of theatrical censorship in 1968?
Royal Court Theatre
CORRECT From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
The Donmar Warehouse
WRONG From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
Soho Theatre
WRONG From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
6. Spencer Perceval became the last (and the only) British Prime Minister to be assassinated. But where did he die?
On the staircase in 10 Downing Street
WRONG Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
In the lobby of the House of Commons
CORRECT Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
Outside his house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields
WRONG Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
7. Described in Parliament by Benjamin Disraeli as “The Gondolas of London” and invented during Victoria’s reign, the Hansom Cab continued in use into the 20th-century. What year was the last license surrendered?
1927
WRONG The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
1937
WRONG The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
1947
CORRECT The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
8. Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre can lay claim to being a last. But what last in London?
The last open-air theatre to be built
WRONG Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
The last timber-framed building to be erected in London
WRONG Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
The last construction with a thatched roof
CORRECT Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
9. On 12 April 2004 Londoners witnessed the last journey down the Thames of an iconic passenger-carrying vehicle. What was that?
Concorde on route to a museum
CORRECT Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
Waverly the last ocean-going paddle steamer
WRONG Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
One of the last Routemaster buses destined for the scrap
WRONG Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
10. Comics talk of ‘dying’ on stage, but which comedian made his last appearance and actually died on a London stage?
Arthur Askey
WRONG On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.
Tommy Cooper
CORRECT On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.
Dickie Henderson
WRONG On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.

Test Your Knowledge: January

Ihave had enough of complaining after having whinged every Wednesday last year. I now propose to drop this regular post and introduce ‘Test Your Knowledge’ on the first Friday of the month. In some ways, it’s easier than having to find another nugget about London not already covered, but still means I’ll have my work cut out giving 10 questions for your delectation. As with last year’s Christmas Quiz, the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation. This month’s quiz has an artistic slant.

1. Of what did actor James Mason give filmgoers a tour of in 1967?
The London That Nobody Knows
CORRECT Based on a book of the same name by Geoffrey Fletcher, this documentary provides a fascinating portrait of pie-and-mash shops and crumbling old music halls. Fletcher’s book also features a drawing of a Holborn toilet with goldfish swimming in the glass cisterns.
The London Dickens Knew
WRONG Based on a book of the same name by Geoffrey Fletcher, this documentary provides a fascinating portrait of pie-and-mash shops and crumbling old music halls. Fletcher’s book also features a drawing of a Holborn toilet with goldfish swimming in the glass cisterns.
London in the Raw
WRONG Based on a book of the same name by Geoffrey Fletcher, this documentary provides a fascinating portrait of pie-and-mash shops and crumbling old music halls. Fletcher’s book also features a drawing of a Holborn toilet with goldfish swimming in the glass cisterns.
2. In the Richard Curtis comedy Notting Hill, the character played by Hugh Grant is the owner of what kind of business?
An antique stall on the Portobello Road Market
WRONG It specialised in travel books and was modelled on the Travel Bookshop at 13-15 Blenheim Crescent, just off Portobello Road.
A bookshop on the Portobello Road
CORRECT It specialised in travel books and was modelled on the Travel Bookshop at 13-15 Blenheim Crescent, just off Portobello Road.
A secondhand record shop on the Portobello Road
WRONG It specialised in travel books and was modelled on the Travel Bookshop at 13-15 Blenheim Crescent, just off Portobello Road.
3. Wardour Street in Soho has been the administrative home of the British movie industry since the 1920s. Which once illustrious film company had offices at 113 Wardour Street?
Hammer Films
CORRECT 113 Wardour Street was home to Hammer House. Hammer produced a stream of popular horror pictures between the late 1950s and early 1970s.
British Lion
WRONG 113 Wardour Street was home to Hammer House. Hammer produced a stream of popular horror pictures between the late 1950s and early 1970s.
London Films
WRONG 113 Wardour Street was home to Hammer House. Hammer produced a stream of popular horror pictures between the late 1950s and early 1970s.
4. Two very different musicians both have blue plaques to their names in adjoining houses in Brook Street. Who are they?
Jimi Hendrix and George Frederick Handel
CORRECT It would be hard to find two musicians more different but Hendrix is said to have been pleased by the coincidence that he was living in a house next door to one in which Handel had composed so much of his music. The Handel & Hendrix in London Museum now occupies 25 and 23 Brook Street respectively.
Noël Coward and Edward Elgar
WRONG It would be hard to find two musicians more different but Hendrix is said to have been pleased by the coincidence that he was living in a house next door to one in which Handel had composed so much of his music. The Handel & Hendrix in London Museum now occupies 25 and 23 Brook Street respectively.
Duke Ellington and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
WRONG It would be hard to find two musicians more different but Hendrix is said to have been pleased by the coincidence that he was living in a house next door to one in which Handel had composed so much of his music. The Handel & Hendrix in London Museum now occupies 25 and 23 Brook Street respectively.
5. What did punk rock legend Ian Dury call his first group?
Kilburn And The High Roads
CORRECT The name apparently derived from a road sign for ‘Kilburn High Road’ that Dury often passed on his way to score dope at the El Rio Club on the Harrow Road.
The Clapham Junction Stranglers
WRONG The name apparently derived from a road sign for ‘Kilburn High Road’ that Dury often passed on his way to score dope at the El Rio Club on the Harrow Road.
Balham and The B-Roads
WRONG The name apparently derived from a road sign for ‘Kilburn High Road’ that Dury often passed on his way to score dope at the El Rio Club on the Harrow Road.
6. In the 19th-century, an as yet unpublished author working for a railway company was tasked with salvaging headstones from a churchyard that was partly in the path of a new line and had them arranged around a tree that today bears his name, where they remain to this day. What is the name of this eponymous mature tree?
The Thomas Chestnut
WRONG An ash in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church reputed to be the oldest church in Britain. King’s Cross was being regenerated in the 1860s, at this time the exhumation of human remains and the removal of tombs was supervised by the architect Blomfield, although he delegated much of this unpleasant task to his young protégé, Thomas Hardy. The tree is known as “The Hardy Ash” has since grown around the gravestones.
The Hardy Ash
CORRECT An ash in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church reputed to be the oldest church in Britain. King’s Cross was being regenerated in the 1860s, at this time the exhumation of human remains and the removal of tombs was supervised by the architect Blomfield, although he delegated much of this unpleasant task to his young protégé, Thomas Hardy. The tree is known as “The Hardy Ash” has since grown around the gravestones.
The Dickens Plane
WRONG An ash in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church reputed to be the oldest church in Britain. King’s Cross was being regenerated in the 1860s, at this time the exhumation of human remains and the removal of tombs was supervised by the architect Blomfield, although he delegated much of this unpleasant task to his young protégé, Thomas Hardy. The tree is known as “The Hardy Ash” has since grown around the gravestones.
7. Rock stars Jimi Hendrix, Rod Stewart and Jeff Beck have a connection with Manor House Station the start of the first Run on The Knowledge. How so?
They all commuted to work from the station
WRONG Manor House was a long-standing coaching house, a tavern that stood at the junction of Green Lanes and Seven Sisters Road from the early 19th-century to the late 20th-century, it was a venue where they all played early in their careers.
They all worked on the Piccadilly Line
WRONG Manor House was a long-standing coaching house, a tavern that stood at the junction of Green Lanes and Seven Sisters Road from the early 19th-century to the late 20th-century, it was a venue where they all played early in their careers.
The station is named after a pub where they all played
CORRECT Manor House was a long-standing coaching house, a tavern that stood at the junction of Green Lanes and Seven Sisters Road from the early 19th-century to the late 20th-century, it was a venue where they all played early in their careers.
8. Berwick Street, once famous for its record shops, featured on the cover of a 1995 album. What are the British band and the seminal album?
Blur – ‘The Great Escape’
WRONG Oasis might have come a cropper against Blur in the big Britpop singles chart showdown, but the Gallagher brothers had the last laugh with their record-breaking second album. ‘…Morning Glory?’ which shifted 347,000 copies in its week of release as the UK went mad for the band’s last gasp of greatness.
Pulp – ‘Different Class’
WRONG Oasis might have come a cropper against Blur in the big Britpop singles chart showdown, but the Gallagher brothers had the last laugh with their record-breaking second album. ‘…Morning Glory?’ which shifted 347,000 copies in its week of release as the UK went mad for the band’s last gasp of greatness.
Oasis – ‘(What’s The Story) Morning Glory?’
CORRECT Oasis might have come a cropper against Blur in the big Britpop singles chart showdown, but the Gallagher brothers had the last laugh with their record-breaking second album. ‘…Morning Glory?’ which shifted 347,000 copies in its week of release as the UK went mad for the band’s last gasp of greatness.
9. Tower House, 29 Melbury Road, Kensington, the turreted Gothuc pile built by William Burgess in 1877 is home to which guitar legend?
Jimmy Page
CORRECT Outbidding David Bowie, Page acquired the property from hell-raising actor Richard Harris in 1974. Occultist filmmaker Kenneth Anger once lived in Page’s basement. In 2015 Page successfully challenged a planning application lodged by his next-door neighbour Robbie Williams.
Eric Clapton
WRONG Outbidding David Bowie, Page acquired the property from hell-raising actor Richard Harris in 1974. Occultist filmmaker Kenneth Anger once lived in Page’s basement. In 2015 Page successfully challenged a planning application lodged by his next-door neighbour Robbie Williams.
Mark Knopfler
WRONG Outbidding David Bowie, Page acquired the property from hell-raising actor Richard Harris in 1974. Occultist filmmaker Kenneth Anger once lived in Page’s basement. In 2015 Page successfully challenged a planning application lodged by his next-door neighbour Robbie Williams.
10. In 1921 English composer Edward Elgar opened which iconic music brand’s first store, and marked by a plaque on Oxford Street near Davis Street?
Pathé
WRONG HMV brought a new look to music buying, with a school within the store. ‘Bright’ young men from the country were encouraged to learn all the fine shades and nice feelings of their profession – how to satisfy varying music tastes, how to pronounce the names of foreign musicians, and generally to understand what they were selling and the idiosyncrasies of those who bought.
His Masters Voice
CORRECT HMV brought a new look to music buying, with a school within the store. ‘Bright’ young men from the country were encouraged to learn all the fine shades and nice feelings of their profession – how to satisfy varying music tastes, how to pronounce the names of foreign musicians, and generally to understand what they were selling and the idiosyncrasies of those who bought.
Columbia
WRONG HMV brought a new look to music buying, with a school within the store. ‘Bright’ young men from the country were encouraged to learn all the fine shades and nice feelings of their profession – how to satisfy varying music tastes, how to pronounce the names of foreign musicians, and generally to understand what they were selling and the idiosyncrasies of those who bought.