Test Your Knowledge: February

Ihope you enjoyed January’s questions and even managed to answer a few. This month’s quiz is about last in London. As before the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Where is the last remaining tollgate in London?
College Road, Dulwich
CORRECT The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
Well Walk, Hampstead
WRONG The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
Strand on the Green, Chiswick
WRONG The toll is owned by Dulwich College, the nearby public school. An old board shows the tolls, which dates from the end of the 18th-century, is still there. Taking a flock of sheep through the gate costs 2d. Pedestrians can pass through it for free.
2. Who was the last person to be executed in the Tower of London?
Henry Laurens, an American spy during the Revolutionary War
WRONG Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
Josef Jakobs, a German spy during the Second World War
CORRECT Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
Carl Lody, a German spy during the First World War
WRONG Josef Jakobs had been parachuted into southern England in July 1941. He injured himself on landing and was soon captured. He was executed by firing squad on a miniature rifle range in the King’s House in the Tower. Carl Lody was executed in November 1914. Henry Laurens, the only American ever imprisoned in the Tower, was there between 1779 and 1781 but was eventually released.
3. Where did the last London tram run to on 6 July 1952?
New Cross
CORRECT The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
Elephant and Castle
WRONG The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
Woolwich
WRONG The first electric trams appeared on London’s streets in 1901 following on from horse-drawn trams which were introduced in 1861. On that final run, the tram’s journey time was extended by almost 3 hours as crowds of cheering Londoners surrounded it along various stages of the route from Woolwich to New Cross.
4. In the 1950s the Thames was declared biologically dead. How many fish species are there today?
Less than 50
WRONG In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
Between 50 and 100
WRONG In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
More than 120
CORRECT In 2016 according to Ian Tokelove of the London Wildlife Trust, there are over 125 types of fish in the Tidal Thames measured from the estuary mouth to Teddington Lock.
5. Which London theatre, known as a writers’ theatre, led to the abolition of theatrical censorship in 1968?
Royal Court Theatre
CORRECT From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
The Donmar Warehouse
WRONG From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
Soho Theatre
WRONG From 1737 until 1968 all plays had to be licensed by the Lord Chamberlain’s office before they could appear on the London stage. The Royal Court had three John Osborne plays refused permission to be performed. Outrage over the bans led to the end of theatrical censorship.
6. Spencer Perceval became the last (and the only) British Prime Minister to be assassinated. But where did he die?
On the staircase in 10 Downing Street
WRONG Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
In the lobby of the House of Commons
CORRECT Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
Outside his house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields
WRONG Spencer Perceval was shot dead in the lobby of the House of Commons at about 5:15 pm by John Bellingham who believed that the government was to blame for his difficulties trading with Russia. He was detained four days after the murder, was tried, convicted and sentenced to death. He was hanged at Newgate Prison one week after the assassination.
7. Described in Parliament by Benjamin Disraeli as “The Gondolas of London” and invented during Victoria’s reign, the Hansom Cab continued in use into the 20th-century. What year was the last license surrendered?
1927
WRONG The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
1937
WRONG The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
1947
CORRECT The last horse-drawn Hackney carriage license was surrendered on 3 April 1947, in fact for the first three decades of the 20th-century, the Hansom Cab outnumbered motorized vehicles.
8. Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre can lay claim to being a last. But what last in London?
The last open-air theatre to be built
WRONG Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
The last timber-framed building to be erected in London
WRONG Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
The last construction with a thatched roof
CORRECT Shakespeare’s Globe had to have special permission to have a thatched roof – there had been a law against thatched buildings in London since the Great Fire in 1666. It took 6,000 bundles of reeds from Norfolk, the reed beds only grow 4,000 a year, a year and a half’s reed supply.
9. On 12 April 2004 Londoners witnessed the last journey down the Thames of an iconic passenger-carrying vehicle. What was that?
Concorde on route to a museum
CORRECT Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
Waverly the last ocean-going paddle steamer
WRONG Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
One of the last Routemaster buses destined for the scrap
WRONG Destined for display at the National Museum of Flight near Edinburgh, with no valid CAA certificate and no crews to fly her, Concorde’s 40-tonne fuselage was carefully driven out of Heathrow on a custom-built trailer costing £1million and carried to the Thames at Isleworth. A purpose-designed heavy barge took her down the Thames on its journey to Scotland.
10. Comics talk of ‘dying’ on stage, but which comedian made his last appearance and actually died on a London stage?
Arthur Askey
WRONG On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.
Tommy Cooper
CORRECT On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.
Dickie Henderson
WRONG On 15 April 1984 Tommy Cooper collapsed from a heart attack in front of millions of television viewers midway through his act on the London Weekend Television variety show ‘Live from Her Majesty’s’ it was transmitted live from Her Majesty’s Theatre in Haymarket.

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