Tag Archives: London quiz

London Firsts Quiz

The coronavirus has given Londoners their first experience of self-isolation and distancing. Corid-19 is, of course, not London’s first pandemic, these seem to arrive every 100 years.

So today’s quiz is all about London’s ‘firsts’.

Questions

1. What was invented in a workshop in Hatton Garden in the 1880s?

(a) The world’s first machine gun
(b) The world’s first tank
(c) The world’s first flame thrower


2. What was invented which was greeted by the Admiralty as: “. . . of any kind are now wholly unnecessary”.

(a) A self-righting ship
(b) An electric telegraph
(c) A non-fraying flag


3. Coram’s Fields commemorates a London first that revolutionised the world. But what?

(a) Charity
(b) Vaccine
(c) Statistics


4. On 10th January 1946, the first meeting took place of what international organisation?

(a) World Health Organisation
(b) Oxfam
(c) United Nations


5. Five years before the last public hanging at Newgate, what was the world’s first when completed?

(a) The first urban underground
(b) The first tramline
(c) The first scheduled bus service


6. Nearly every country now has one, but Croydon saw the world’s first. But what was it that is now commonplace?

(a) A radio station
(b) An international airport
(c) A department store


7. Today we take it for granted, but what world’s first was constructed near Holborn Viaduct?

(a) The world’s first public electricity generating station
(b) The world’s first sewage treatment works
(c) The world’s first water pumping station


8. What invention was first demonstrated in a room above what is now the Bar Italia coffee lounge in Frith Street, Soho?

(a) The espresso coffee machine
(b) The television
(c) The vacuum cleaner


9. What did Joseph Merlin demonstrate for the first time at a masquerade party in Soho in 1760?

(a) The kaleidoscope
(b) The penny-farthing bicycle
(c) Roller skates


10. In 1905 two brothers named Stratton were convicted of robbery and murder at a paint shop in Deptford High Street. What methodology was used to secure convictions?

(a) The first identikit portrait from a witness, the local milkman
(b) The first case in which fingerprints were successfully used to convict
(c) Their getaway car, which had an early number plate was identified leading to the police tracking them down


As a bonus: What ‘first’ did Colonel Pierpoint admire before he died?

Answers

1. What was invented in a workshop in Hatton Garden in 1880?

(a) Hiram Maxim was an American who moved to London, opened a workshop in Hatton Garden, near the junction with Clerkenwell Road and eventually became a naturalised Briton and a knight of the realm. His Maxim Gun invented in 1881 was the first fully automatic machine gun. At Shangari River in 1893 Cecil Rhodes’ troops, armed with a Maxim Gun, only lost four men and killed 1,500 natives. Not content with killing native Africans he went on to invent the first auto-resetting mousetrap.


2. What was invented which was greeted by the Admiralty as: “. . . of any kind are now wholly unnecessary”.

(b) In 1816 Francis Ronalds, at 26 Upper Mall, built a telegraph using electrostatic and clockwork principles, rejected by the Admiralty he was knighted in 1870, a belated recognition of his pioneering vision.


3. Coram’s Fields commemorates a London first that revolutionised the world. But what?

(a) In 1739 Captain Thomas Coram, a London merchant was appalled by the number of abandoned babies he saw, he set up the Foundling Hospital, the world’s first charity, Handel and Hogarth were among the benefactors of the world’s first incorporated charity. Coram’s Fields are unique in only allowing adults if accompanied by a child.


4. On 10th January 1946, the first meeting took place of what international organisation?

(c) The First General Assembly of the United Nations, with 51 nations represented, was held in the Methodist Central Hall, Westminster, a successor to the League of Nations, which was thought to have been ineffective in preventing World War II.


5. Five years before the last public hanging at Newgate, what was the world’s first when completed?

(a) Opening in 1863, the Metropolitan Railway between Paddington (then called Bishop’s Road) and Farringdon was the world’s first urban underground passenger-carrying railway. Confusingly, the original platform now serves the Hammersmith & City Line.


6. Nearly every country now has one, but Croydon saw the world’s first. But what was it that is now commonplace?

(b) In 1920 the world’s first international airport opened in Croydon, offering flights to Europe. A remodelling 8 years saw the world’s first purpose-built airport terminal and airport hotel.


7. Today we take it for granted, but what world’s first was constructed near Holborn Viaduct?

(a) The world’s first public electricity generating station was opened in 1882 to light the lamps on the bridge. Designed by Thomas Edison, it was steam-powered and supplied DC current, and predated New York’s power station by some months.


8. What invention was first demonstrated in a room above what is now the Bar Italia coffee lounge in Frith Street, Soho?

(b) John Logie Baird began his research into the transmission of visual images in Hastings in the early 1920s, but in 1924 rented an attic room at 22 Frith Street to use as a workshop. On 26th January 1926 members of the Royal Institution made up the first television audience. A blue plaque is displayed above Bar Italia commemorating that day.


9. What did Joseph Merlin demonstrate for the first time at a masquerade party in Soho in 1760?

(c) Roller skates were first demonstrated at famous society hostess’ Mrs Cornelys Soho Square house by clock and instrument maker John Joseph Merlin. Making an appearance at the party gliding across the floor on boots that he had adapted by fitting them with wheels, unfortunately, he had failed to devise a method of stopping himself and he crashed into a large mirror.


10. In 1905 two brothers named Stratton were convicted of robbery and murder at a paint shop in Deptford High Street. What methodology was used to secure convictions?

(b) On 27th March 1905, Chapman’s Oil and Paint Shop was raided and the shopkeeper murdered. A thumb mark was left on the emptied cash box. Using a method of identification that had been in use for a couple of years, it was the first time the Crown achieved a murder conviction and one of the first in the world to use the methodology still in use today.


As a bonus: What ‘first’ did Colonel Pierpoint admire before he died?

At his expense in 1864 Colonel Pierpoint had London’s first traffic island constructed in St. James’s Street opposite his club in Pall Mall. On its completion, his excitement (and possible inebriation) encouraged him to dash across the road to admire his contribution to society. Alas, he was knocked down and killed by a passing cab.

Blue Sky Thinking Quiz

With skies bluer than at any time in living memory, the lack of pollution turning it a deeper shade of blue, normally found on remote tropical islands, this week’s quiz turns to above our heads and London’s air.

Questions

1. Heathrow’s first passenger terminal was opened by the Queen in which year?

(a) 1955
(b) 1957
(c) 1959


2. England’s first manned balloon flight by Vincenzo Lunardi on 15th September 1784 took off from which London location?

(a) St. James’s Park beside what is now Buckingham Palace
(b) The Artillery Ground in Moorfields
(c) Outside St. Paul’s Cathedral


3. What was ‘The Skylon’ which once stood on the South Bank between Waterloo Bridge and Hungerford Bridge?

(a) A sculpture
(b) An aeroplane
(c) A skyscraper


4. From where in London did A. V. Roe launch the first powered flight in Britain by a British citizen in a British plane?

(a) Hyde Park
(b) Green Park
(c) Walthamstow Marshes


5. Why did a performance of La Traviata at Sadler’s Wells Theatre have to be abandoned in December 1952?

(a) Smog drifting into the theatre was so thick that the audience could scarcely see the performers
(b) A burst of hailstones brought down part of the ceiling
(c) Rain caused the nearby New River Head to flood the area


6. Much like today in December 1976 all planes at Heathrow were grounded. For what reason?

(a) Intelligence that the IRA were to hijack a passenger plane
(b) A flying pig
(c) A freak electrical thunderstorm


7. The weathervane of Liberty department store depicts what?

(a) The Statue of Liberty
(b) The Pilgrim Fathers’ ship the Mayflower
(c) Hermes the Greek God of Merchants


8. 7 Bruce Grove was the last home of Luke Howard, but for what is he known?

(a) He is known as the namer of clouds
(b) He deduced why the sky is blue
(c) He invented the modern weather station


9. In the film Mary Poppins, how much money does it cost to acquire ‘paper and strings’ to Go Fly a Kite?

(a) One penny
(b) Tuppence
(c) Thrupence


10. As my picture, taken above Romford, shows, plane contrails were once a familiar sight above London, as these ephemeral trails mark flight paths that criss-cross the city. The planes causing these vapour trails are held in holding stacks, but how many stacks does Heathrow have?

(a) Twelve
(b) Eight
(c) Four


As a bonus what is the cabbie speak for: A frarney?


Answers

1. Heathrow’s first passenger terminal was opened by the Queen in which year?

(a) On 16th December 1955 unveiled The Queen’s Building at London Airport, its name only revealed at the end of Her Majesty’s speech. Later renamed Heathrow, the original site was opened on 31st May 1946, with its first arrival a BOAC Lancastrian from Australia.


2. England’s first manned balloon flight by Vincenzo Lunardi on 15th September 1784 took off from which London location?

(b) Taking off in an impressive red-and-white silk balloon from Moorfields Artillery Ground, now the Honourable Artillery Company in City Road, Lunardi was lauded as the ‘idol of the whole nation’. Later balloons became a fashionable addition to London’s pleasure grounds, Charles Green’s party trick was to ascend from Vauxhall Gardens on horseback.


3. What was ‘The Skylon’ which once stood on the South Bank between Waterloo Bridge and Hungerford Bridge?

(a) A futuristic, 300ft high cigar-shaped aluminium sculpture with, as people joked at the time, ‘no visible means of support’, the Skylon was constructed as part of the Festival of Britain in 1951. Dismantled the following year, it was made into commemorative paper-knives and artefacts.


4. From where in London did A. V. Roe launch the first powered flight in Britain by a British citizen in a British plane?

(c) In 1909 Alliott Verdon Roe, who had been inspired by watching albatrosses in flight during his time in the merchant navy, constructed an early aeroplane under a viaduct and flew his Avro Triplane for 306 yards across the Marshes. A blue plaque marks the arches that he used as a workshop.


5. Why did a performance of La Traviata at Sadler’s Wells Theatre have to be abandoned in December 1952?

(a) The Great Smog of 1952 was the worst in the twentieth century, caused mainly by coal fire smoke, visibility in the city was reduced to inches. Several thousand would die from associated bronchial and cardiovascular illnesses associated with its inhalation. The reduction in air quality would bring about the Clean Air Act of 1956, and the imposition of the use of smokeless fuels.


6. Much like today in December 1976 all planes at Heathrow were grounded. For what reason?

(b) A pink pig had been strung between the chimneys of Battersea Power Station for the cover shoot of Pink Floyd’s album Animals. When the pig broke its moorings and floated away, all planes were grounded and the RAF was scrambled to chase it to ground in Kent.


7. The weathervane of Liberty department store depicts what?

(b) The weathervane has a detailed replica of The Mayflower, the ship that carried the Pilgrim Fathers to North America. The shop itself is made of ships: its mock Tudor facade was fashioned from the timbers of HMS Hindustan and HMS Impregnable (formerly known as HMS Howe and once the largest ship in the world). Liberty is also the size of a ship: The Great Marlborough Street frontage is the same length as the Hindustan.


8. 7 Bruce Grove was the last home of Luke Howard, but for what is he known?

(a) Luke Howard died on 21st March 1864 at 7 Bruce Grove, Tottenham. He proposed the nomenclature system that we still use today to identify clouds. He was also the first person to observe and measure the fact that London is warmer than the surrounding countryside. His Blue Plaque at Bruce Grove states: ‘Luke Howard 1772-1864 Namer of Clouds Lived and Died here’.


9. In the film Mary Poppins, how much money does it cost to acquire ‘paper and strings’ to Go Fly a Kite?

(b) Bert (Dick Van Dyke) sings: With tuppence for paper and strings/You can have your own set of wings/With your feet on the ground/You’re a bird in flight/ With your fist holding tight/To the string of your kite.


10. As my picture, taken above Romford, shows, plane contrails were once a familiar sight above London, as these ephemeral trails mark flight paths that criss-cross the city. The planes causing these vapour trails are held in holding stacks, but how many stacks does Heathrow have?

(c) Forming a web across its six international airports, the routes that planes take into, out of, and across London are designed to cause the least disturbance to the fewest number of people. Heathrow has four holding stacks above Bovingdon, Ockham, Biggin and Lambourne. Incoming planes circle above navigation beacons until they get the green light from air traffic control to begin their final approach.

As a bonus what is the cabbie speak for: A frarney?

A frarney is rain or a rainstorm, from rhyming slang ‘France and Spain’. Also known as Mushers Lotion, rain bringing more work to those owning their cab, or mushers.

London cab quiz

With work on London’s streets almost non-existent most cabbies are finding other ways to occupy their enforced sabbaticals. Today’s quiz is a reminder of the halcyon days when cabs were in demand. We start with the easy one, and if you don’t get this one you shouldn’t be wasting your time reading CabbieBlog.

Questions

1. All licensed taxi drivers in London need to pass a comprehensive test before they can ply for hire. What is the test called?

(a) The Knack
(b) The Knowledge
(c) The Opinionated


2. Where was London’s first cab rank?

(a) In Piccadilly
(b) In the Strand
(c) In Oxford Street


3. When a cabbie is awarded a license, he is given a Bill and Badge. His badge is then displayed whenever he is working, but what is his Bill?

(a) An invoice detailing his expenses up to that date
(b) A police mentor, as in the nickname ‘old bill’
(c) His licence


4. Frederick Hitch was once London’s most famous cabbie, but for what?

(a) He was awarded the Victoria Cross
(b) He was a music hall entertainer
(c) He was also King George V’s chauffeur


5. Who or what was The Resistance?

(a) Cabbies who once fought alongside the Partisans in German-occupied France
(b) Harley Street
(c) Spoken ironically about poor brakes on early cabs


6. When were licences first issued to London cabbies?

(a) 1654
(b) 1754
(c) 1854


7. The passenger compartment is jolly spacious, but what are the origins of the roof height?

(a) A gentleman didn’t have the inconvenience of removing his top hat when boarding
(b) With any lower head height, passengers would hit their heads on the roof when the vehicle hit potholes
(c) So that up to three hay bales could be stacked inside to feed horses


8. How, or where should you not hire a cab?

(a) Outside one of those cabbies’ green shelters
(b) Emulating a scene from your favourite black and white film by shouting “TAXI” while simultaneously waving in a frantic fashion
(c) Poking your head into the nearside window of a stationary cab at traffic lights


9. What is the entomology of the word taxi?

(a) The word comes from the penal rates once charged to the proprietors of vehicles
(b) It comes from the taximeter now found on all legal cabs
(c) Queen Victoria didn’t like Joseph Hansom the inventor of the famous Hansom cab and always referred the classic horse-drawn vehicles as ‘taxites’, her term for unaccountable


10. When boarding a licensed London cab, apart from your destination, what must you tell the driver

(a) If you have the bubonic plague
(b) If you are registered disabled
(c) That you might change your mind as to the destination


Answers

1. All licensed taxi drivers in London need to pass a comprehensive test before they can ply for hire. What is the test called?

(b) The Knowledge
To gain the coveted Green Badge that allows them to work anywhere in Greater London, all cabbies must learn 320 routes and everything in between. It can take between 3 and 5 years to pass. You can read more about it HERE.


2. Where was London’s first cab rank?

(b) In the Strand
Charles Bailey, a retired mariner, in 1635 placed four hackney coaches for hire at the Maypole in the Strand where St. Mary’s Church now stands. Later, blue posts denoted cab ranks, hence several pubs by that name. You can read more about it HERE.


3. When a cabbie is awarded a license, he is given a Bill and Badge. His badge is then displayed whenever he is working, but what is his Bill?

(c) His licence
Who would guess that a cab driver’s licence, referred to as his ‘bill’, is short for ‘bill of health’? This is ironic considering that most Victorian cabbies worked until they died, or ended in the workhouse if they couldn’t continue working, despite the efforts of the Cabmen’s Benevolent Association. You can read more about it HERE.


4. Frederick Hitch was once London’s most famous cabbie, but for what?

(a) He was awarded the Victoria Cross
Most would not know of the Anglo-Zulu war of 1879 if it wasn’t for the Battle of Rorke’s Drift, and its popularisation by Michael Caine’s first major film, where 155 British soldiers repulsed 4,000 Zulus warriors, resulting in 32 British killed or wounded against nearly 900 Zulus. After the conflict medals which everybody would have heard of – the Victoria Cross – were awarded to 11 men one of which was Frederick Hitch. It was the largest number of gallantry medals ever given to a single regiment, for actions on a single day. You can read more about it HERE.


5. Who or what was The Resistance?

(b) Harley Street
The Resistance was a derogatory nickname given to Harley Street as it was populated by doctors opposed the formation of the NHS after the War. You can read more about it HERE.


6. When were licences first issued to London cabbies?

(a) 1654
Oliver Cromwell ordered the Court of Aldermen of the City of London to grant licences to 200 hackney coachmen. A 6-mile limit was imposed as London’s chain of defences, that had been erected during the Civil War in 1642, only extended to that perimeter and beyond it was considered unsafe. You can read more about it HERE.


7. The passenger compartment is jolly spacious, but what are the origins of the roof height?

(a) A gentleman didn’t have the inconvenience of removing his top hat when boarding
By law, taxicabs had to be tall enough for a passenger to sit comfortably while wearing a top hat, especially important during Ascot. Additionally, at one time, hackney carriages were required to carry a bale of hay for the horse. This law was held over for a time even after motorised cabs began to operate. You can read more about it HERE.


8. How, or where should you not hire a cab?
(b) Whilst emulating a scene from your favourite black and white film by shouting “TAXI” while simultaneously waving in a frantic fashion
Technically, it’s against the law for you to yell “Taxi!” to get their attention. If you see a cab with a lit sign, just hold out your arm to signal them, and if you’re not drunk he will stop. You can read more about it HERE.


9. What is the entomology of the word taxi?
(b) It comes from the taximeter now found on all legal cabs
The term ‘taxi’ comes from taximeter, the counter used to measure miles travelled and fare. ‘Cab’ was short for ‘cabriolet’, a French verb for ‘to leap’, which was a type of taxi and what one did to exit them. You can read more about it HERE.


10. When boarding a licensed London cab, apart from your destination, what must you tell the driver
(a) If you have the bubonic plague
It was also once supposedly illegal for people to hail a cab while suffering from the bubonic plague. This is still partly true, as the Public Health (Control of Disease) Act of 1984 requires a person suffering from a notifiable disease to inform the cab driver, who may then decide whether to ferry the passenger. If he does so, he is then required to notify the authorities and disinfect the cab before taking another fare. You can read more about it HERE.

Lock Down London Quiz

London is now a ghost town, and places where we dined, drank and danced are closed, but how much do you know about London’s places of entertainment?

Questions

1. The 2 I’s coffee bar on Old Compton Street is often called the birthplace of British rock ‘n’ roll, hosting early performances by Cliff Richard and Tommy Steele. But what did the ‘I’ stand for?

(a) Iranians
(b) Italians
(c) Intellectuals


2. What is the connection between Dirty Dick’s pub opposite Liverpool Street Station and Charles Dickens?

(a) The famous novelist’s father drank himself to death there
(b) The pub’s collection of stuffed cats inspired the novelist to write The Old Curiosity Shop
(c) Its namesake provided the basis for Miss Havisham in Great Expectations


3. Norman Balon, the proprietor of Soho’s Coach and Horses for over 60 years, was celebrated as ‘the rudest landlord in London’. Under what name did he often appear in the satirical magazine Private Eye?

(a) Bally Balon, the benign friend of the boozer
(b) Monty Balon, the genial mine host
(c) Norman Nice, the kindly landlord


4. Since 1820, what has a sailor done each Good Friday at the Widow’s Son pub in Bow?

(a) Rung the Bow Bell kept behind the bar
(b) Poured a pint to celebrate Christ’s resurrection
(c) Placed a hot cross bun in a basket hanging from the ceiling


5. The Prospect of Whitby in Wapping is London’s oldest remaining riverside inn. What was it originally named?

(a) The Smuggler’s Rest
(b) The Devil’s Tavern
(c) The Damn Your Eyes


6. What ‘first’ opened in Portman Square in 1810?

(a) London’s first dance hall
(b) The first kitchen to offer takeaway food
(c) The first Indian restaurant in London


7. Which famous London building stands on the site where the French chef Alexis Soyer opened a restaurant complex called the ‘Gastronomic Symposium of All Nations’ in 1851?

(a) Royal Albert Hall
(b) Victoria & Albert Museum
(c) Natural History Museum


8. Which area of London supposedly takes its name from that of the landlord of a pub in the early seventeenth century?

(a) Parsons Green
(b) Pentonville
(c) Pimlico


9. What caused the death of 8 people in the Tottenham Court Road area on 17 October 1814?

(a) One of London’s first recorded food poisoning incidents
(b) A second-floor dance hall floor gave way
(c) The Great London Beer Flood


10. In what unusual location did 14 men gather to dine on 23 October 1843?

(a) Inside a model dinosaur at Sydenham Hill
(b) Under the Thames in a tunnel dug by Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s father
(c) On top of Nelson’s Column


Answers

1. The 2 I’s coffee bar on Old Compton Street is often called the birthplace of British rock ‘n’ roll, hosting early performances by Cliff Richard and Tommy Steele. But what did the ‘I’ stand for?

(a) Before two Australians involved in the world of wrestling acquired the lease of the cafe in the early 1950s, it was owned by three Iranian brothers and they called it the 3 I’s. Apparently one of them left and so it ended up as the 2 I’s.


2. What is the connection between Dirty Dick’s pub opposite Liverpool Street Station and Charles Dickens?

(c) The original Dirty Dick was a young dandy called Nathaniel Bentley who owned a warehouse on Leadenhall Street. On the eve of his wedding his bride-to-be died, grief-stricken, he gave up washing, neglected his appearance, and rarely would be seen in public for the rest of his days. Charles Dickens edited Household Words, a magazine in which a poem based on Bentley’s squalid life appeared.


3. Norman Balon, the proprietor of Soho’s Coach and Horses for over 60 years, was celebrated as ‘the rudest landlord in London’. Under what name did he often appear in the satirical magazine Private Eye?

(b) Private Eye’s journalists would lunch regularly in the upstairs room of the pub. At Balon’s retirement, Private Eye’s editor paid tribute to the landlord as: “The only man grumpier than me.” Balon’s autobiography, fittingly, was entitled You’re Barred, You Bastards!


4. Since 1820, what has a sailor done each Good Friday at the Widow’s Son pub in Bow?

(c) A widow lived in a cottage which once stood on the site. Her sailor son was due to arrive home on Good Friday. She put a hot cross bun aside for him on his return. Each year she kept a bun, but he never returned. The ritual was subsequently taken up by the pub after her death.


5. The Prospect of Whitby in Wapping is London’s oldest remaining riverside inn. What was it originally named?

(b) The Devil’s Tavern. Built-in 1520, it was a popular haunt of smugglers. Its current name derives from a ship that traded between London and the North Yorkshire fishing town of Whitby.


6. What ‘first’ opened in Portman Square in 1810?

(c) The Hindostanee Coffee House opened off Portman Square in 1810. Its owner, Dean Mahomed, offered in the words of his advertisements ‘India dishes in the highest perfection’ but, sadly, the public wasn’t ready for them and the Hindostanee wet bust in 1812.


7. Which famous London building stands on the site where the French chef Alexis Soyer opened a restaurant complex called the ‘Gastronomic Symposium of All Nations’ in 1851?

(a) Soyer bought Gore House, a mansion which stood where the Royal Albert Hall now stands, attempting to improve Londoner’s culinary habits. Extravagantly furnished, the venture was a disaster, losing Soyer £7,000 in five months.


8. Which area of London supposedly takes its name from that of the landlord of a pub in the early seventeenth century?

(c) Ben Pimlico was supposedly a publican famous for his ‘nut-brown ale’.


9. What caused the death of 8 people in the Tottenham Court Road area on 17 October 1814?

(c) On that date a huge vat burse its hoops in the Horseshoe Brewery in Tottenham Court Road. This ruptured other vats and eventually more than a million litres of beer swept through the brewery walls and into the streets. The sea of beer carried away neighbouring houses and drowned eight people. The site of the Horseshoe Brewery is now occupied by the Dominion Theatre.


10. In what unusual location did 14 men gather to dine on 23 October 1843?

(c) Fourteen of the stonemasons who had worked on the construction of the column ate a meal on the platform at its top just before the statue of the admiral was placed upon it. The large model of a dinosaur was the setting for a dinner 11 years earlier. The reconstruction of an iguanodon, together with others, can still be seen today. Marc Brunel’s tunnel under the Thames was used for a banquet or 150 people in 1827.

 

Florence Nightingale Quiz

The giant plague hospital is now opening today at the Excel Centre in Docklands, and has been named the Nightingale Hospital. How much do you know about ‘The Lady with the Lamp’? Florence Nightingale was born nearly 200 years ago.

Questions

1. Florence Nightingale was born on 12th May 1820 in Italy and was named after her place of birth – Florence. But where did she die?

St. Bartholomew’s Hospital
Guy’s Hospital
Mayfair
Grosvenor Square


2. Where are the statues commemorating the Crimea War, one of which depicts Florence Nightingale?

Waterloo Place
Army Museum
Guards Barracks
Imperial War Museum


3. Known as ‘The Lady with the Lamp’, what is wrong with the lamp held by Florence Nightingale on her Crimean War statue?

It is extinguished
She’s holding it the wrong way round
It is the wrong type of lamp
She never actually had a lamp


4. In Crimean War statue Florence Nightingale reputedly has something in her pocket. What is it?

An early stethoscope
Her spectacles
An owl
A thermometer


5. Where in London is the Florence Nightingale Museum?

The Hunterian Museum
The British Museum
St. Thomas’ Hospital
Her old London home


6. A favourite example of taxidermy is to be found in the Florence Nightingale Museum. What is stuffed there?

Her pet dog
Her pet cat
A fish caught by her
Her pet owl


7. Apart from the new temporary hospital, where else is the Florence Nightingale Hospital in London?

Harley Street
Lisson Grove
University College London
Guy’s Hospital


8. In London, there is a second public statue. What is unusual about it?

Florence Nightingale is wearing spectacles
It is made of an unknown material
She is wearing a large hat
It is a copy


9. The nursing school at King’s College London has an enviable record. What is it?

It is the oldest nursing school in the world
Successful students are the world’s most sought
More nurses qualify than anywhere else
The school is located in a listed building


10. Some remarkable anagrams can be formed from Florence Nightingale’s name. Can you devise any?


Answers

1. Florence Nightingale was born on 12th May 1820 in Italy and was named after her place of birth – Florence. But where did she die?

Answer: Mayfair

Florence Nightingale lived in South Street, Mayfair from 1865 until her death there on 13th August 1910 aged 90.


2. Where are the statues commemorating the Crimea War, one of which depicts Florence Nightingale?

Answer: Waterloo Place

Three statues are to be found at the junction of Waterloo Place and Pall Mall. Sidney Herbert, Secretary of State for War during the Crimean War, The Crimean Memorial and Florence Nightingale’s which has bronze plaque showing wounded soldiers arriving at Scutari Hospital which cared for 10,000 wounded in the Crimean War.


3. Known as ‘The Lady with the Lamp’, what is wrong with the lamp held by Florence Nightingale on her Crimean War statue?

Answer: She’s holding the wrong type of lamp

The lamp is of Roman design and not like the lamp Florence Nightingale used at Scutari.


4. In Crimean War statue Florence Nightingale reputedly has something in her pocket. What is it?

Answer: She carried Athena her pet owl in her pocket.


5. Where in London is the Florence Nightingale Museum?

Answer: St. Thomas’ Hospital


The Florence Nightingale Museum is located within St. Thomas` Hospital; nurses working there are called Nightingales.

6. A favourite example of taxidermy is to be found in the Florence Nightingale Museum. What is stuffed there?


Answer: Athena an owl rescued by her was left behind when she went to the Crimean War, it died. So heartbroken she had it stuffed and can still be seen.


7. Apart from the new temporary hospital, where else is the Florence Nightingale Hospital in London?

Answer: Lisson Grove

In 1909 a new hospital was built in London to her specifications. Nurses were required to be sober, honest, truthful, trustworthy, punctual, quiet and orderly, clean and neat. Renamed the Florence Nightingale Hospital for Gentlewomen in 1910, since 1978 is has been run in conjunction with the Fitzroy Nuffield Hospital.


8. In London, there is a second public statue. What is unusual about it?

Answer: Is a copy


The Guard’s Crimean Memorial in Waterloo Place of her by Arthur Walker has been copied. This statue, in the Central Hall of St. Thomas’ Hospital by Frederick Mancini is virtually a life-sized version of the original. In 1970 the statue was stolen and a replacement copy, made of a composite material, which was originally located outside, was moved inside in 2000. So this statue is a copy of a copy.


9. The nursing school at King’s College London has an enviable record. What is it?

Answer: It is the oldest nursing school in the world

The Nightingale Training School and Home for Nurses opened at St. Thomas’ Hospital on 9th July 1860. Now called the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery and is the oldest nursing school in the world still in operation.


10. Some remarkable anagrams can be formed from Florence Nightingale’s name. Can you devise any?

From Florence Nightingale’ you can derive:

‘Flit on, cheering angel’

‘Going? Then clean rifle.’

‘Reflecting on healing’

and remarkably

‘No lice, filth, gangrene’.