Christmas Quiz 2021

On the eve of Christmas Day here are ten festive London questions. As with the previous quizzes, the correct answer will turn green when it’s clicked upon and expanded to give more information. The incorrect answers will turn red giving the correct explanation.

1. Where was Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night first performed?
Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre
WRONG Twelfth Night was first performed on 2nd February 1602 in the Middle Temple, one of the four law schools in London collectively known as the Inns of Court.
The Middle Temple
CORRECT Twelfth Night was first performed on 2nd February 1602 in the Middle Temple, one of the four law schools in London collectively known as the Inns of Court.
The Curtain Theatre
WRONG Twelfth Night was first performed on 2nd February 1602 in the Middle Temple, one of the four law schools in London collectively known as the Inns of Court.
2. What theatre was built on the profits of pantomime?
The Palladium
WRONG Harlequin was the star of 18th-century pantomime, which proved popular with paying audiences. In 1732 John Rich, the most notable early Harlequin who danced but never spoke, built Covent Garden Theatre with the profits of his magical pantomimes.
Covent Garden Opera House
CORRECT Harlequin was the star of 18th-century pantomime, which proved popular with paying audiences. In 1732 John Rich, the most notable early Harlequin who danced but never spoke, built Covent Garden Theatre with the profits of his magical pantomimes.
Theatre Royal, Drury Lane
WRONG Harlequin was the star of 18th-century pantomime, which proved popular with paying audiences. In 1732 John Rich, the most notable early Harlequin who danced but never spoke, built Covent Garden Theatre with the profits of his magical pantomimes.
3. What inspired the first Christmas cracker?
A sugary sweet
CORRECT London-based sweet maker, Tom Smith, created the first Christmas Cracker in 1847. He was inspired by bonbons wrapped in a twist of tissue paper when on a visit to Paris.
A firework
WRONG London-based sweet maker, Tom Smith, created the first Christmas Cracker in 1847. He was inspired by bonbons wrapped in a twist of tissue paper when on a visit to Paris.
A crackling fire
WRONG London-based sweet maker, Tom Smith, created the first Christmas Cracker in 1847. He was inspired by bonbons wrapped in a twist of tissue paper when on a visit to Paris.
4. Which English king was crowned on Christmas Day?
William the Conqueror
CORRECT After winning the Battle of Hastings on 14th October, William the Conqueror was crowned King of England on Christmas Day 1066 at Westminster Abbey.
William III
WRONG After winning the Battle of Hastings on 14th October, William the Conqueror was crowned King of England on Christmas Day 1066 at Westminster Abbey.
William of Orange
WRONG After winning the Battle of Hastings on 14th October, William the Conqueror was crowned King of England on Christmas Day 1066 at Westminster Abbey.
5. The Christmas Day swimming race in Hyde Park’s Serpentine Lake is now called the Peter Pan Cup, how far do the contestants have to swim?
100 yards
CORRECT The first-ever organised Christmas Day swim was in 1864. The Boxing Day Dip is now a popular charity event that takes place each year.
250 yards
WRONG The first-ever organised Christmas Day swim was in 1864. The Boxing Day Dip is now a popular charity event that takes place each year.
500 yards
WRONG The first-ever organised Christmas Day swim was in 1864. The Boxing Day Dip is now a popular charity event that takes place each year.
6. Who, or what brought back the West End’s illuminated festivities in the 1970s?
The Artist (formally known as Prince)
WRONG Regent Street and Oxford Street’s Christmas lights were banned between 1971 and 1977 to save money. But thanks to Prince Charles, they returned in 1978.
Prince Charles
CORRECT Regent Street and Oxford Street’s Christmas lights were banned between 1971 and 1977 to save money. But thanks to Prince Charles, they returned in 1978.
Black Prince Scotch Whisky
WRONG Regent Street and Oxford Street’s Christmas lights were banned between 1971 and 1977 to save money. But thanks to Prince Charles, they returned in 1978.
7. Where did Bob Cratchit in the novel A Christmas Carol live?
Hackney
WRONG Bob Cratchit, Scrooge’s clerk in A Christmas Carol, lived in Camden. Charles Dickens himself resided as a child at 16 Bayham Street, Camden if you fancy visiting the plaque.
Lambeth
WRONG Bob Cratchit, Scrooge’s clerk in A Christmas Carol, lived in Camden. Charles Dickens himself resided as a child at 16 Bayham Street, Camden if you fancy visiting the plaque.
Camden
CORRECT IBob Cratchit, Scrooge’s clerk in A Christmas Carol, lived in Camden. Charles Dickens himself resided as a child at 16 Bayham Street, Camden if you fancy visiting the plaque.
8. Which monarch delivered the first Royal Christmas Day Message?
Edward VII
WRONG The Christmas broadcast was started by King George V the Queen’s grandfather, Rudyard Kipling wrote the 251-word message. Over listened on their radios 20 million – due to its success, George V continued to make an annual Christmas broadcast for the rest of his reign.
Queen Elizabeth II
WRONG The Christmas broadcast was started by King George V the Queen’s grandfather, Rudyard Kipling wrote the 251-word message. Over listened on their radios 20 million – due to its success, George V continued to make an annual Christmas broadcast for the rest of his reign.
George V
CORRECT The Christmas broadcast was started by King George V the Queen’s grandfather, Rudyard Kipling wrote the 251-word message. Over listened on their radios 20 million – due to its success, George V continued to make an annual Christmas broadcast for the rest of his reign.
9. What did Scottish nationalist students take from Westminster Abbey on 25th December 1950?
The Stone of Scone
CORRECT On Christmas Day 1950, four students took The Stone of Scone from Westminster Abbey back to Scotland. The 2008 film Stone of Destiny illustrates the incident.
The Communion plate
WRONG On Christmas Day 1950, four students took The Stone of Scone from Westminster Abbey back to Scotland. The 2008 film Stone of Destiny illustrates the incident.
A Chalice
WRONG On Christmas Day 1950, four students took The Stone of Scone from Westminster Abbey back to Scotland. The 2008 film Stone of Destiny illustrates the incident.
10. Visiting Father Christmas at Harrods is a magical experience for London’s little residents. But which year did he first make an appearance in the world-famous department store?
1945
WRONG That year Harrods bought Birmingham department store Rackhams.
1955
CORRECT That year Harrods bought Birmingham department store Rackhams.
1965
WRONG That year Harrods bought Birmingham department store Rackhams.

6 thoughts on “Christmas Quiz 2021”

  1. Hang on – No.10. I clicked 1945. Came up ‘Wrong’! No. Must be right. Or 1940s anyway. Definitely not as late as1955. As a child I was taken to visit Father Christmas in Harrods every year. By 1955 I was 15 – much too old! Now that’s showing up exactly how ancient I am!!! Happy Christmas!
    P.S, The Harrods Father Christmas never gave presents. The joy was in actually meeting him. I knew that he was the ‘Real’ Father Christmas, all the others around (they were not everywhere you turned in those days) were human beings dressed up. Harrods F.C. was the REAL one!

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    1. We’ll have to wait for a definitive answer from Harrods on that one. You couldn’t have seen the REAL one as my grandson saw him in Finland a couple of years ago. Happy Christmas.

      Like

    2. Hi Caroline
      Did you receive the picture of Squire Bancroft’s shelter at its original site that I sent you?

      Like

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